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How to brake consistenly?

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  • How to brake consistenly?

    My question is kind of noob.
    I'm stuck with high 2:02- low 2:03( stock STI,z2) for 6 months now and my problem is always over/less braking at corner entry. Ideal lap time shows 2:01.87. Actually I know where I'm slow every hot lap due to over/less braking.
    I know I should find some braking points but buttonwillow is hard to find one.

    How to brake consistenly and properly? Any suggestion?
    Thx
    VA(15) STI/FRS

  • #2
    1. Find braking markers
    2. Use them
    3. Adjust as needed
    WWW.949RACING.COM
    SuperMiata

    Aside from their cost I never understood why people race them.
    But obviously I just dont get it. -fatbillybob

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    • #3
      It's common. Braking is one of the defining elements of our sport.

      Looking UP and AHEAD makes for better braking (and better corners).

      Many drivers are too focused on entry, which can sometimes do whacky things with target fixation. Sighting your trajectory through the corner and where you plan to exit will make for quicker more consistent laps, esp. w2w scenarios. You'll be ahead of the car. Your mind does a lot of neat things subconsciously to naturally go where you're looking.

      Braking points are excellent benchmarks to learn a new track, especially when establishing patterns and rhythm for consistency. But these points should (and will) gradually fade to the background as you settle in. After you initiate the braking event, you should do another mirror check and then resume looking through the corner and through the exit. Then, you'll probably find that you're more often thinking about how early you can go to gas and less preoccupied by when to brake.

      Note - the late braking trap - not always faster, and often the consequences are much, much slower. Positioning the weight balance in the optimal spot for any given car is far more important. Few cars want it all loaded on the nose as you coax the turn in, and giving yourself time to ease the brake and settle can work wonders (especially with figuring out what works best for your car/tires/track on that given day - and that's especially if you trail brake too).

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      • #4
        Originally posted by SeanB View Post
        Looking UP and AHEAD makes for better braking (and better corners).

        Many drivers are too focused on entry, which can sometimes do whacky things with target fixation. Sighting your trajectory through the corner and where you plan to exit will make for quicker more consistent laps, esp. w2w scenarios. You'll be ahead of the car. Your mind does a lot of neat things subconsciously to naturally go where you're looking.

        .
        This! If you are inconsistent then it's likely target fixation and not looking up through the corner. Use brake markers as a reference point and then get your eyes up and ahead. At Buttonwillow I use the white berms entering the corners at Sunrise and Sunset as reference points for braking. I don't really think about brake markers while I'm driving but subconsciously I probably use them in most corners. The only track where I really consciously use brake markers is Cal Speedway since we are entering the brake zones at such high speeds.
        99 C5 corvette SCCA GT2
        99 Supermiata "Super"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by emilio700 View Post
          1. Find braking markers
          2. Use them
          3. Adjust as needed

          This.

          I'll probably get some flak for this but pick a safe turn and learn the limits until you overshoot a couple of times. Then you will know what it feels like to overdo it and the expected behavior of your car in that situation. Part of the holdback is not knowing what will happen. Once you safely experience it, you'll get more comfortable pushing the limit.

          T14 at Thill and T7 at Sonoma are good safe places to try this out. Obviously check your surroundings before and after when going for it.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by RobertR1 View Post
            I'll probably get some flak for this but pick a safe turn and learn the limits until you overshoot a couple of times. Then you will know what it feels like to overdo it and the expected behavior of your car in that situation. Part of the holdback is not knowing what will happen. Once you safely experience it, you'll get more comfortable pushing the limit.
            That is actually a good technique.
            To the right of The Sheriff. Isn't everyone?

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            • #7
              the skidpad on streets CCW is fantastic for it (as much as I hate that track)

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