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  • Driving style

    What is your driving style? I guess we all have one. I don't know what mine is. How much is driving style the car you drive?

  • #2
    Flatout
    WWW.949RACING.COM
    SuperMiata

    Aside from their cost I never understood why people race them.
    But obviously I just dont get it. -fatbillybob

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    • #3
      Originally posted by emilio700 View Post
      Flatout
      but you got 100hp... So is that your driving style or your car dictating style to a great degree?

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      • #4
        My driving style varies...
        Private track day vs amateur race day.
        Passenger in car or no passenger.
        New paint or old paint on my race car, (self/car preservation).
        Racing a car for sale reduces my interest in risk taking.

        Driving style varies between my 911 and front engine V8 cars.
        Some can drive 3 different cars in one day.
        I'm more comfortable trying to drive just one car well all day.

        I do like to left foot brake everything that allows it...
        The nannies that kill the throttle when both pedals pushed requires a change in driving style.
        Last edited by passmenow; 03-12-2017, 07:51 AM.
        IMSA/SCCA Camaros

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        • #5
          Originally posted by passmenow View Post
          My driving style varies...

          I do like to left foot brake everything that allows it...
          The nannies that kill the throttle when both pedals pushed requires a change in driving style.
          This sounds more like a car dependent thing than someone who says they always brake in a straight line for example. I LFB automatics all day long. But my vette has a stick and my brain is too stupid to allow my left foot to clutch and LFB so in a clutch car I don't. Last weekend I was racing a very simple track and was bored so I really tried to LFB the vette and shift as needed. I found a trick (for me) which was to LFB go back to the dead pedal. Clutch and go back to the deadpedal. LFB back to the dead pedal and that starting referrence point made my brain allow each operation. IF I let my foot hang out over the brake I was just as likely to press the brake in when I wanted clutch as I was to properly go for the clutch. All that said I found my vette has really good corner entry and really LFB did me no good. That might be due to a square tire set-up that tends to take out corner entry understeer. So again the driving style was really car set-up dependent.


          Most modern cars will nanny you when you press both pedals. Is there a way to defeat that in general? Using both pedal can be an advantage but my vette has so little power in this class configuration that I feel no need for that fine balance that might benefit a car with lots more power and torque.

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          • #6
            I drive with overly acute anticipation which is awesome for situational awareness, bad for overall speed and lap times. I STILL shuffle steer, but I think it's a size constraint (my right hand will contact my thigh above the knee. I'm a 'flow' driver and I think I have above average spatial awareness. The only times I seem to be faster is on a damp or wet track. For some reason, I really enjoy narrower tires on small wheels over wider ones on larger wheels. I'm trying to rationalize that last bit.
            Yer pal,
            Force

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            • #7
              Originally posted by fatbillybob View Post
              Most modern cars will nanny you when you press both pedals. Is there a way to defeat that in general?
              None of my cars have nannies so thankfully have not had to deal with it much.
              LFB is common on low hp carts so it is not a big power technique only.
              The old thunder roadsters have low hp and they provide both a left foot and and right foot brake pedal.
              It helps me in the 300hp 911 as well.

              Learning to LFB 15 years ago was my best driving/car control improvement.
              My driver issue was large size 14 feet in a small pedal box, left foot hovering over the brake gave me confidence that I could find the brake pedal immediately.
              Here is an admission I installed a remote brake light above my shift light so I can see if my left foot is activating my brake lights unnecessarily.
              I even have my pit guy advise the driver on grid behind me that I LFB and that I am not intentionally brake light checking them.
              Here LFB was not for car control or weight transfer but for avoiding being pushed off the track.
              https://youtu.be/UR04l6sAj64?t=6m17s

              I RFB during heel toe downshifts but it is awkward after downshifting to switch from RFB back to LFB.

              Yes when first learning my LFB footwork I came onto the front straight with a car behind me...
              It was the only time I ever forgot to move my left foot from brake to clutch.
              I gave that poor guy the wildest brake check as we tracked out onto the straight I slammed on the brakes instead of the clutch...quickly learned never to do that again...

              My driving style is going to change again soon when I start driving a sports car to occasion track days instead of towing.
              Without a trailer keeping the car in shape for the drive home becomes a priority.
              IMSA/SCCA Camaros

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              • #8
                Quarter mile at a time

                Click image for larger version

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                99 C5 corvette SCCA GT2
                99 Supermiata "Super"

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                • #9
                  Driving styles are limitations.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Stuntman View Post
                    Driving styles are limitations.
                    This.


                    The driver most able to adapt to the conditions, competition strategy and inputs the car wants will be the most successful.
                    WWW.949RACING.COM
                    SuperMiata

                    Aside from their cost I never understood why people race them.
                    But obviously I just dont get it. -fatbillybob

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I would have to go with the word "sportsmanlike." I drive as fast as I can without going over the edge where I'm not sure I can make a pass. I'm not an aggressive blocker, either.

                      Early in the race, I can appreciate someone else getting a run on me and making a clean pass. Late in the race, my level of appreciation decreases, so I might be a little more furtive in a one-move block. I don't think I'd make a two-move block because it's illegal and a bit dickish if you ask me.

                      I'd also use the word "predictable" because it's safer for everyone and ultimately more fun because mishaps are fewer. I really enjoy the friendship of the people I race with. I'd like to keep it that way.

                      That's probably not very exciting or type A, but it seems to work for me. Maybe as I get faster that'll change.
                      www.TrackHQ.com

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                      • #12
                        I don't think blocking is cool on any level. Driving a defensive line is fine, but once you start making a move to kill the momentum of the other driver, that to me is not sportsmanlike.

                        But all of that is not a driving style. That is a race tactic.
                        To the right of The Sheriff. Isn't everyone?

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                        • #13
                          Dickish is a style. And I know drivers that have it.

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                          • #14
                            Like most motorcycle guys I'm a trail braker. A friend once described my style as slippery smooth; I'm getting the most (or trying) out of all 4 tires at once.

                            My fabricator has called me a chameleon; I adapt to what a car needs immediately and with no effort. This does have its down side. In a car with little or no adjustments it's fine but rather tha drive around something change the set up dummy.

                            Also like most motorcycle racers I'm also on the agressive side as well extremely comfortable with oversteer. Being blessed with better than average car control can lead you down a blind alley.

                            And yes I agree driving styles can be a limitation; I find understeery cars a chore to drive. If you want to be amused watch me drive a shifter kart, unlike cars that where I seem to adapt I spend the first session reminding myself I don't need to trail the brakes. My motorcycle tuner once said that "if Tom doesn't like a bike in the first 100 yards he never will" sadly it's pretty much true when it comes to bikes.

                            Tom
                            Last edited by Tom1200; 03-16-2017, 08:32 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jamz14 View Post
                              Dickish is a style. And I know drivers that have it.
                              I have that short style of driving.
                              To the right of The Sheriff. Isn't everyone?

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