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Thread: LFX (GM V6) in a Miata @ Goodwin Racing

  1. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by emilio700 View Post
    OK, I'll stop writing things in this thread now.
    Please don't!

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    But you did miss a chance to use my favorite "emoji".


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    Oil Cooling

    First the hurdle. The factory oil filter setup is a cast aluminum housing that bolts to the left side of the block and extends up to hold the filter canister up near the fill cap. You can see the housing just forwards of the dipstick:



    To run an oil cooler we need an inlet and outlet for the lines, but a traditional sandwich plate won’t work here because of the unique shape of the ports where the block and housing meet:



    Conveniently, Keisler Automation has been working on a solution. Here is their oil reroute plate:



    This plate has a pair of M16x1.5 ports to which I added the metric to -10AN adapters. It also has an ⅛ NPT port for a sensor, but I found its location to be too cramped beside the larger fittings (and the GM oil pressure sensor is M14x1.5 anyways) so after this pic was taken I plugged that port and put the sensor in the remote filter plate:



    As I mentioned in the power steering post, the factory oil filter housing can’t be removed without taking the steering pump off because the factory bolts are too long. There’s no getting around this the first time, but when installing the Keisler plate I switched the two forward bolts to shorter ones - this makes it possible to remove/install the plate with the steering pump in place. I forgot to write it down but I believe I used M8x1.25x25mm:



    With the in/out for the hoses sorted all that’s left is a remote filter and a cooler. For the remote filter adapter it was important to me for it to be mounted to the engine so that removing the engine requires as little disassembly as possible. I played with a few locations and came up with doubling up the filter adapter on the same bracket that holds the power steering reservoir. Here’s the filter adapter mounted up to that bracket (now powdercoated black) with the steering reservoir not yet mounted:



    Here it is with the steering reservoir in place. The filter location ended up mimicking the factory location a bit. Oil changes will be a breeze:



    Now for lines and the cooler. For the cooler I chose another Earl’s unit - same depth and length as the power steering unit but taller; 19 rows instead of 7.

    Just as I did with the power steering system, in order to make the entire nose assembly quickly removable I chose to add dry breaks here. Staubli -10AN units for the oil lines:



    Here’s the full system just before final install. I fit the dry breaks directly to the cooler so that the feed and return lines remained one line each rather than being split into two. Fire sleeves on the portion of the lines that are anywhere near the exhaust. The short line is oil plate outlet to remote filter inlet and the long lines of course go to the cooler:



    Installed:

    Ryan Passey
    Singulär Motorsports | Goodwin Racing

    #13 1990 Miata
    "The sport dedicating to the spirits of time attacking motoring" -Emilio

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    There's still a bunch of assembly to be done before it's driving (rear end, suspension, interior, etc.) but we're close to first test start. All that's left is wiring... not a small thing but I can feel it getting close!

    Current view from the front:

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    Ryan Passey
    Singulär Motorsports | Goodwin Racing

    #13 1990 Miata
    "The sport dedicating to the spirits of time attacking motoring" -Emilio

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    BMW Master bawareca's Avatar
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    Ha-ha, the wiring seems to be underestimated in any project. Although it should have been one of the "easier" tasks for me, it took me a huge amount of time and anger. I am now 80% done and trying to find some some inner strength to finish this job. Good luck with yours!
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    Apologies for it being quiet for a little while, I've been spending long hours building the wiring harness. I wanted to be rid of the hacked up factory wiring mess once and for all so I chose to take the long road and removed every wire from the car, because now was the right opportunity to take the extra time and learn how to build good motorsports wiring from the ground up.

    For now, here's a pic from way back on step 1 with wires laid out for the new chassis harness:

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    Ryan Passey
    Singulär Motorsports | Goodwin Racing

    #13 1990 Miata
    "The sport dedicating to the spirits of time attacking motoring" -Emilio

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    I love the quality of the workmanship and the attention to detail. Nice work, Ryan. Great stuff, really.

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    http://www.trackhq.com/Banners/yellowsitesponsor.gif emilio700's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ucfbrett View Post
    I love the quality of the workmanship and the attention to detail. Nice work, Ryan. Great stuff, really.
    By putting in 1500hrs now he frees up a lot of time for beer drinking trackside while the lesser Miatae all tend to their broken cars.
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    Aside from their cost I never understood why people race them.
    But obviously I just dont get it. -fatbillybob

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    http://www.trackhq.com/Banners/yellowsitesponsor.gif Blackbird's Avatar
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    I always get a chuckle when someone says "this XYZ engine is cheap!" implying that a swap will be "cheap X00 horsepower".
    By the time Ryan's car will be done it's going $200k in labor and materials, easily.
    Heck, when you give it some thought, in most nicely done swaps the purchase of engine itself is one of the cheaper contributors to the overall cost.
    Last edited by Blackbird; 03-10-2017 at 04:04 PM.
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    The Real Captain Slow Red_5's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackbird View Post
    I always get a chuckle when someone says "this XYZ engine is cheap!" implying that a swap will be "cheap X00 horsepower".
    By the time Ryan's car will be done it's going $200k in labor and materials, easily.
    Heck, when you give it some thought, in most nicely done swaps the purchase of engine itself is one of the cheaper contributors to the overall cost.
    True but that's true, maybe to a lesser extent, of any project. Ryan mentioned this earlier that engines are wear items so while the first one isn't cheap or easy, later replacement engines will be. And, like most projects, Ryan could have done this swap with a lot less effort but he trying to optimize everything while he's in there. I'm sure you know all of this from personal experience.
    Last edited by Red_5; 03-10-2017 at 04:42 PM.
    99 Mazda Miata SuperMiata #515 - AKA Sparky SOLD
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    http://www.trackhq.com/Banners/yellowsitesponsor.gif emilio700's Avatar
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    Track ready turbo kit for an early Miata: $5500

    "So it costs $5550 to build a turbo track Miata?

    Prepping the rest of the car so it will survive the added power and speed: $12,000
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    But obviously I just dont get it. -fatbillybob

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    And let's not forget that for some people part of the fun is building the car.
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    Quote Originally Posted by emilio700 View Post
    By putting in 1500hrs now he frees up a lot of time for beer drinking trackside while the lesser Miatae all tend to their broken cars.
    There is going to be so. much. time. for beer drinking later. It's the promise of that which keeps me going.
    Ryan Passey
    Singulär Motorsports | Goodwin Racing

    #13 1990 Miata
    "The sport dedicating to the spirits of time attacking motoring" -Emilio

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    You are fortunate to have ProWire USA down by you. They are a great resource.

    Mark
    AiM Data and Video systems, Suspension Setup, Race car builds, support, and rentals. At your beck and call.

    Mark Nichols
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    Quote Originally Posted by markn View Post
    You are fortunate to have ProWire USA down by you. They are a great resource.

    Mark
    Great guys over there and they're an excellent source for the good stuff
    Ryan Passey
    Singulär Motorsports | Goodwin Racing

    #13 1990 Miata
    "The sport dedicating to the spirits of time attacking motoring" -Emilio

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    Not long now, almost finished with wiring (que the mad scientist laugh).

    WIRING

    For the engine swap, the minimum wiring to get the thing fired up isn't bad, particularly if you opt to have V8R prep the engine harness for you (I did). You could certainly retain most of the factory wiring on the chassis side and just tie in where needed. However... I had a few things on the wish list for this car that meant there was more work to do.

    Over the years of racing and modifying this car, the wiring has become a bit of a mess with things added, wiring cut to remove things, etc. etc. To eliminate any potential for issues for the future, I decided the best approach was to remove all of the existing wiring on the chassis side from the car and start from scratch with good materials, practices, and documentation. This is also the most time consuming approach, but c'est la vie.

    Step 1 through 10 of a big wiring project is all planning, long before any tools or wires come out. As soon as you go down this path, if there's an issue in the future you can't just open up a factory service manual to check the wiring diagram. The ease or difficulty of service/troubleshooting in the future now comes down entirely to the quality of the documentation you create.

    I began with drawing up an electrical diagram for my new chassis wiring:



    Working off the electrical diagram, I made a spreadsheet listing each individual wire that would be present in the harness - including the wire's name/purpose and where each end terminates. Each wire is assigned a unique numerical ID. If you've ever tried to identify a certain wire in a harness you'll know the struggle that can be - even with the multitude of wire colors that factories use you still end up with duplicates of certain colors and you end up having to break out the multimeter to test wires and sort out what's what. By assigning each wire a unique ID and labeling the wire accordingly (more on that later) there is no guesswork left to do, just consult the master sheet and look up the wire number.

    Here's a screenshot of the top of the list. All in, there's about 100 wires on the chassis side:



    A great feature with having this in spreadsheet form means that if you stay consistent with the info you put in each cell then once the list is done you can sort the list alphabetically by whichever column you need. This was really handy during the build as I could easily switch between sorting by harness, numerical order, system, etc.

    The remaining piece to the puzzle is knowing how to lay out the harness. The simplest method is to just start laying wires in the car from point A to B to get lengths, but I wanted to be able to build the harness out of the car and also have the plans so that everything is replicable in the future if necessary.

    I took measurements on the car and then drew up the build plans:



    Much of the above is a bit overkill. The key info there is the lengths between splits and the layout. The rest isn't necessary but I like to be thorough - with this plus the connector diagrams that I show just a bit further down, I could build a matching replacement harness without any need to refer to the car or the original harness.

    With the planning sorted it was time to start laying out the harness. Transferred the measurements to a 4'x8' sheet of particle board with screws placed at each branch split for turning points.



    Referring back to the wire list above, each wire gets labeled with tits ID number on both ends. Here is where the thermal label printer got a workout:





    All of the wires used are milspec /32 series with tin plating and very abrasion/temperature resistant insulation. This stuff is a big jump forward from standard cross-link OE wire in terms of durability and is also more conductive and lighter weight. It sounds obvious but the wire is the core of the car's electonics and nothing else can make up for poor quality wire. IMO this isn't the place to scrimp.

    With wires laid out and labels we begin to loom the harness. The black woven material is resin infused fiberglass braid that holds up to 1200 degrees. That gets finished at each end with short lengths of adhesive tube to prevent fraying and seal the wires where the harness splits. You can see that assembling the loom requires some forward-thinking because each section often needs several more various pieces sleeved over it that will be shrunk down later:



    Also in the pic above is the bulkhead connector already assembled. That connector contains each wire that will pass from through the firewall into the engine bay, which makes it very quick and easy to disconnect the engine side of the wiring from the car so the engine can be pulled quickly without having to disconnect the wiring harness from the engine.

    As I build the harness, I fill out a pin layout sheet for each connector in the harness. When I began the harness build this sheet had blank spaces next to each pin, and I filled the sheet out as I assembled connectors:



    And a few progress shots of the harness in various stages of the build...

    This is the main break point where wires split off towards the center console switch area and the fuse/relay assembly:



    Finishing the wire terminations:



    Same set of wires complete with connectors:



    Similarly finished ends that go to the fuse/relay box:



    Close-up of the connector that goes to the new digital dash. Re-pinned with the milspec wire, labeled, etc.



    Wiring up the fuse/relay box:



    Backside of the finished fuse/relay box, tidied up with service/strain relief loops on each wire:



    The finished fuse/relay box and harness:



    Finished main chassis harness (connectors to Racepack dash, OE brake pedal , GM gas pedal, fuses/relays, OBDII, all switches, tail harness, diff temp sensor harness):



    About to get installed in the car! Also pictured are some of the secondary harnesses, switch assemblies, etc.

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    Ryan Passey
    Singulär Motorsports | Goodwin Racing

    #13 1990 Miata
    "The sport dedicating to the spirits of time attacking motoring" -Emilio

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    Quote Originally Posted by thepass View Post
    ...each wire gets labeled with tits ID number on both ends....
    Ah, the things you catch during proof-reading.
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    Ryan Passey
    Singulär Motorsports | Goodwin Racing

    #13 1990 Miata
    "The sport dedicating to the spirits of time attacking motoring" -Emilio

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    Administrator ucfbrett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thepass View Post
    Ah, the things you catch during proof-reading.
    How Freudian.

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    Switching gears a bit, this car will need some serious brakes... and they arrived today

    Newly released V8R 11.75" BBK with Stoptech billet STR42 caliper. Ohhhh yeah baby, track testing can't come soon enough!



    Paired with my AP Racing J-hook rotors on V8R hats:

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    Ryan Passey
    Singulär Motorsports | Goodwin Racing

    #13 1990 Miata
    "The sport dedicating to the spirits of time attacking motoring" -Emilio

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    Impressive build man. Sooo much dedication to that harness.
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    Less powah is better

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