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Thread: BMW 128i for BMWCCA / NASA enduro

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    http://www.trackhq.com/Banners/yellowsitesponsor.gif Blackbird's Avatar
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    Default BMW 128i for BMWCCA / NASA enduro

    The guys at team HQ Autosport recently decided to move on from Spec E46 to running with BMWCCA and NASA WERC in a 128i.
    Given that they were super happy with the SE46 we built for them in the past, choosing a shop to build the new chassis was easy

    To clear with BMWCCA and NASA class rules we went with a tightly fitting 8 point cage with gusseted pyramid X door bars and finished it off with Maui Blue paint -



    An FIA certified Cobra Sebring halo seat with nets on both sides offers plenty of support for the drivers -







    The fitment of the cage is tight enough that if class rules allowed it we could've stitched the tubing directly to the chassis in many areas, see halo and A-pillar for example -





    ^ Baja 1000 look is temporary

    We also went ahead and installed a 22 gallon fuel cell in the trunk, setting it as low as possible while still keeping enough clearance for the exhaust system to snake through -



    The fuel cell is sitting in a very robust cradle, mitigating the risks of a rear end crash -



    We also fabricated a custom Aluminum bulkhead panel to separate the trunk from the driver -



    Enjoy!

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    Administrator ucfbrett's Avatar
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    Beautiful work as always.

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    BMW Master bawareca's Avatar
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    Great as always. i am working extra hours so I can afford Moti's services someday for my next project.
    Moti, i have a question about the fuel cell. What are the cons/pros of the fuel cell vs the stock location mounted fuel tank?

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    JJ1
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    Moti, I’ve seen the “triangle” vs the “x” in the rear supports and roof in some other builds. Seems like a good way to get the torsional rigidity but maybe save a little weight? Why did you go this route for this build vs other builds? Do you have a set logic behind that you could share or just customers request?

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    http://www.trackhq.com/Banners/yellowsitesponsor.gif Blackbird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bawareca View Post
    Moti, i have a question about the fuel cell. What are the cons/pros of the fuel cell vs the stock location mounted fuel tank?
    Stock location is better since it's under the back seat, placing it low in the chassis, within the wheelbase (better placement of weight) and far away from potential impacts.
    Problem is in order to use the stock location your choices are limited to using the stock tank or spending a good chunk of money on a custom fuel cell which at this size will also require a lot of sheet metal work (which some racing series don't even allow).
    This raises the cost of switching to a fuel cell by some extra thousands of dollars which is why you rarely see it in club racing level builds, but for a pro level car I wouldn't even think twice.

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    http://www.trackhq.com/Banners/yellowsitesponsor.gif Blackbird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JJ1 View Post
    Moti, I’ve seen the “triangle” vs the “x” in the rear supports and roof in some other builds. Seems like a good way to get the torsional rigidity but maybe save a little weight? Why did you go this route for this build vs other builds? Do you have a set logic behind that you could share or just customers request?
    There are many reasons to go either way and thus we switch between them according to what's right for each build.
    I'm not going to get into each and every one of them, but here are a few of the aspects we take into consideration -
    X brace is stronger and stiffer within a given square and thus some times is the clear choice, but if you look at the halo and the rear legs as a longer square (divided by the main hoop), you'll notice that the V shapes are essentially an X -



    V shape roof structure allows more headroom for occupants and is typically the choice for builds that are likely to have 2 people in the car.
    I typically add FIA bars to the structure of a cage like the one in this BMW but the team requested to eliminate them for easier driver changes as they do take a chunk of the door opening.
    Last edited by Blackbird; 11-24-2017 at 10:14 AM.
    BOWERSdaAZIAN and JJ1 like this.

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    BMW Master bawareca's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackbird View Post
    Stock location is better since it's under the back seat, placing it low in the chassis, within the wheelbase (better placement of weight) and far away from potential impacts.
    Problem is in order to use the stock location your choices are limited to using the stock tank or spending a good chunk of money on a custom fuel cell which at this size will also require a lot of sheet metal work (which some racing series don't even allow).
    This raises the cost of switching to a fuel cell by some extra thousands of dollars which is why you rarely see it in club racing level builds, but for a pro level car I wouldn't even think twice.
    I understand this, I should've formulated my question better. Would you replace the stock tank at any cost, or with other words do you see some terrible flaws with it in racing environment?

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    Senior Member fatbillybob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blackbird View Post
    Stock location is better since it's under the back seat, placing it low in the chassis, within the wheelbase (better placement of weight) and far away from potential impacts.
    Problem is in order to use the stock location your choices are limited to using the stock tank or spending a good chunk of money on a custom fuel cell which at this size will also require a lot of sheet metal work (which some racing series don't even allow).
    This raises the cost of switching to a fuel cell by some extra thousands of dollars which is why you rarely see it in club racing level builds, but for a pro level car I wouldn't even think twice.
    Notice Moti also did the right thing which is to bulkheaded the rear firewall sectioning it off from the fuel cell. This was missed in the professional C6 corvette that burned Earnhardt Jr. about 10 years ago. Personally I won't drive a car that has a fuel cell, oil or fuel lines, or drysump tank I can see from the driver's seat. I want all that stuff walled off. Another fine job from Moti!
    Olitho and bawareca like this.

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    http://www.trackhq.com/Banners/yellowsitesponsor.gif Blackbird's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bawareca View Post
    I understand this, I should've formulated my question better. Would you replace the stock tank at any cost, or with other words do you see some terrible flaws with it in racing environment?
    We received the car w/o the stock tank so I honestly don't know what it looks like nor how good or bad it performs in terms of starvation.
    Some cars have the factory tank placed well and designed so that it allows you to run all the way until it's dry (Miata is a good example, it runs down to fumes), some cars start starving when the tank is still half full (350Z comes to mind).
    The central-rear location of a factory tank is very good for weight dist and crash protection, if it works well in terms of starvation you might run it as-is, but the safest solution is always going to be a fuel cell located within the wheel base.
    This is something that we do fairly consistently in time attack builds because they don't need the range that a W2W car requires (let alone enduro car), so we stuff a smaller cell that's enough for a few laps within the wheelbase, typically located where the factory tank used to be, for example the Focus RS build I shared -

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    The Real Captain Slow Red_5's Avatar
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    Do you know offhand which class this will compete in? Just curious where it fits.
    99 Mazda Miata SuperMiata #515 - AKA Sparky SOLD
    '91 Mariner Blue Miata project AKA Napoleon

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    http://www.trackhq.com/Banners/yellowsitesponsor.gif Blackbird's Avatar
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    I want to say E2, but not sure.

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    Beautiful, as always.

    Maybe I missed it, but is there a bar going through or underneath the dashboard?

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    http://www.trackhq.com/Banners/yellowsitesponsor.gif Blackbird's Avatar
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    There's a bar under the dash.

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