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Thread: Exclusive: TrackHQ.com interview with Boris Said

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    Default Exclusive: TrackHQ.com interview with Boris Said

    Anyone familiar with contemporary motor racing, of nearly any kind, knows the name Boris Said. His shock of curly dark brown hair, signature goatee and his success in so many forms of motorsport have made him a household name in households where racing is spoken.

    In his 25-year career as a race car driver, Said has competed in the United States, Europe and Australia in everything from off road races to stock cars, prototypes and sports sedans in sprint and endurance racing. Beginning in 1988 as the Sports Car Club of Americaís Rookie of the Year, Said went on to win Showroom Stock GT at the Runoffs for three consecutive years. Those successes led him from the ranks of amateur to professional racing driver, and to this day, Said is the only American driver to have won the 24 Hours of the Nurburgring.

    In addition to his successes in Europe, Said has competed in the SCCA Trans Am series, IMSA in which he won 15 races, including the 1997 and 1998 Rolex 24 Hours of Daytona and the 1998 12 Hours of Sebring. Said also began racing in the NASCAR series in 1997 with the then-titled Craftsman Truck Series. His experience in sports racing led other NASCAR teams to employ him as a driving coach to other Sprint Cup drivers when the tour visited road courses such as Infineon and Watkins Glen.

    In addition to co-owning K1 Speed karting centers and running his BMW dealership in Murrieta, Calif., Said still maintains a racing schedule on three continents. Clearly, he isnít slowing down.

    TrackHQ.com caught up with him by phone for the following Q&A interview.

    If you prefer to read offline, download the PDF of the transcript:

    BorisSaidInterview.pdf

    boris1.jpg
    Boris Said
    Age: 49
    Height: 6í4Ē
    Weight: 215 lbs.
    Occupation: race car driver, co-owner of K1 Speed karting centers and owner of BMW of Murrieta Calif., BMWís first new franchise issued in 12 years.
    Years racing: 25
    Family status: married with an 8-year-old son



    TrackHQ: Tell us a bit about K1 Speed karting centers. How did you come to co-own the chain?
    Boris Said: I met David Danglard when they were opening their first one in Carlsbad, and we just kind of became friends. We both like racing and itís my hometown, so I just kind of got involved with him after he opened the first one and now we have 11 of them.

    TrackHQ: Whatís your day-to-day involvement with K1?
    Boris Said: Not so much day to day, I mean, they handle all that. Iíll go in an do special events and I give them a lot of memorabilia to put in all the stores, cars and driving suits, and things like that. Day to day, Iím hands on in my car dealership and my racing. Thatís what I do 99 percent of the time.

    TrackHQ: Do you hold the record at your local K1Speed track?
    Boris Said: No, itís probably held by somebody light, somebody very light, usually, but we also change our track layouts a lot in our stores, so itís never really the same record.

    TrackHQ: Do you oversee any of the track layouts?
    Boris Said: Sometimes, I give a little input on how we can do it. Certain locations we have, theyíre more suitable for changing the layout a lot. So we try to keep it fresh and change it about every four or five months.

    TrackHQ: Whatís keeping you busiest these days?
    Boris Said: When Iím not away racing, and this year Iíll do about 30 to 35 races, I am 12 hours a day in my dealership. So Iíd say itís a tossup between racing, traveling and my BMW dealership.

    TrackHQ: What is your fitness regimen? What do you do to prepare in the days leading up to a race?
    Boris Said: I do a lot of cardio. I live on a mountainside and I mountain bike a lot and do a lot of cardiovascular stuff. But Iíve raced so much over the years, I mean racing is still the best way to keep in shape. Itís hard to duplicate the heat and stress in a race car.

    In the off-season, Iím really busy doing that, but in the middle of the race season, itís really tough to keep a consistent schedule because youíre traveling so much.

    TrackHQ: What series are you racing with?
    Boris Said: This year Iíll do five NASCAR races, Iím doing the whole Grand Am Rolex Series in the Whelen Corvette. Iím doing the whole Grand Am Continental Challenge in a Turner BMW. Then Iím going to go to Surferís Paradise and race a V8 Supercar. Then Iíll do a couple DLN at Nurburgring this year. And then probably the Baja 1000 and probably a couple of short-track CORR (Championship Off Road Racing) races.

    TrackHQ: You have raced so many different kinds of cars. Do you have a favorite? Why?
    Boris Said: I have a couple, I guess. Racing at Daytona on a super speedway in NASCAR is some pretty exciting racing, but probably the 2005 BMW M3 GTR that I won Nurburgring with on the old course, thatís probably my favorite car ever.

    TrackHQ: What kind of racing do you find more challenging, ovals, super speedways or road courses?
    Boris Said: If you ask a NASCAR guy, itís harder for them to road course race because theyíve grown up on ovals. When I started dabbling in NASCAR, it was such a foreign thing to me. It was so different from road racing. That was really hard. Those guys are so good, and just to control one of those heavy cars at 200 mph into a corner, itís not easy. Those guys, I think, are some of the best in the world.

    You know, challenging tracks like Nurburgring, tracks like Bathurst, those are very difficult tracks. I donít think you can say one is easier than the other. To be at the top level of anything is hard.

    TrackHQ: Are those guys operating on super speedways at 6 degrees of slip angle all the way around that track at 200 mph?
    Boris Said: Yes. Itís a very uneasy feeling when youíre used to a sports car thatís stuck the ground with downforce a lot of grip and light weight. You get into one of those things, and youíre turning in at 200 and youíre using the side of the car, the side force to keep from spinning out. So, youíre kind of free in, and it is an uneasy feeling.

    TrackHQ: And youíre doing five NASCAR races this year?
    Boris Said: Yeah, Iím going do all the road courses, and the Brickyard 400 at Indy.

    TrackHQ: Changing gears a little bit, you won the 24 hours of the Nurburgring. How is it even possible to memorize all those turns?
    Boris Said: Itís just long. Itís 15.5 miles around with the F1 circuit. Surprisingly enough, it didnít take me that long to memorize the track. Six or seven laps, I had it pretty much memorized, but itís one of those tracks that youíre always learning on. Not only is the track hard, but the weather conditions are unlike any other track in the world. You can have rain or snow or dry track. All around the circuit could be different. And then when you race the 24-hour race there, they start 230 cars, so the traffic and the amount of carsówhen youíre in a fast caró that you pass in a lap, is completely insane. There are so many disciplines that you have to be good at to be fast there, besides the track being hard. Youíve got to deal with the weather, youíve got to deal with the traffic, knowing when to pass, when not to pass. It is probably the biggest challenge Iíve ever had being in a race car.

    TrackHQ: Now, of those 230 cars, how many different classes do they have and what are the speed differentials among them?
    Boris Said: Well, on a 15.5 mile track, the slow cars, you lap them every three laps, so the speed difference has to be 40 mph down the straightaway. That makes it difficult. There are probably 12 different classes racing, everything from a Mini Cooper to the top class, like a DTM car or a BMW M3 GTR.

    TrackHQ: What is it like to be an American racing and winning in Europe? Can you give us a glimpse of what that meant to you?
    Boris Said: It was probably one of the most satisfying moments of my career. Youíre proud to be an American, and the Nurburgring is basically in the Ardennes Forest where the Battle of the Bulge was in World War II. Thatís the track that Hitler built in the 1930s to be the biggest, baddest track in the world, which he did. And I guess when I was up there, all I was thinking was, ĎIf Hitler was alive now, looking at a tall lanky American winning on his track, heíd roll over in his grave.í It was a good feeling, patriotic and satisfying, and itís one of the toughest tests in motorsports, so to tick it off the list was really special to me.

    TrackHQ: Letís move to a different track. Can you put into words what itís like to race around Spa Francorchamps, with particular emphasis on Eau Rouge?
    Boris Said:Itís funny you say that. I won there the first year I was there in a Callaway Corvette, and that was pretty cool. But going through Eau Rouge, in the old days, 10 years ago, it was unbelievably hairy. Every lap your hair would stand up on your arms going down the straightaway toward Eau Rouge.

    TV doesnít do it justice as to how steep it is. The run into Eau Rouge, itís a pretty steep downhill and youíre flat out, whatever the car will do, 170, 180 mph. Then you hit bottom and itís straight uphill and itís completely blind. The right-left is blind. I had one of the biggest crashes in my career in testing there, in Eau Rouge. I had a wheel come off, the left rear, as I entered Eau Rouge. It was one of the biggest hits Iíve ever taken where I didnít lose consciousness and stayed awake through the whole wreck. It was a yard sale. I wrote off a $700,000 M3 there, but it is just an awesome track.

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    TrackHQ: Letís move on to driving instruction. Can you recall what were the best pieces of driving instruction you ever got? What were some of your ďaha momentsĒ?
    Boris Said: The best instruction I ever got was when I told my first instructor that I wanted to be a professional race car driver and he looked at me and said, ĎOSB.í I said, ĎWhat is that? A book or a tape?í He goes, ĎNo, no, Ďother sports beckon.í Trust me. You donít want to give up your day job to do this. You donít really have it.í

    It was a pretty mean thing to say, you know, but really it was good advice. And that really made me think about it. Iím not any good. Iíve got to figure out how to get good. I mean, really, itís a game of mistakes. Youíre always learning. You never really have it. Iíve never felt like, ĎOK, Iíve got it now.í I feel like every time I drive, I get better and better and better.

    TrackHQ: When you heard that, and you realized you needed to get better or perish, what did you do?
    Boris Said: Every time I got in, when I saw someone faster, I asked ĎWhy is he faster. What do I need to do? Do I need to drive in deeper. Do I need to get off the brake?í It really made me look at everything I did closer. A lot of young kids Iíve helped and taught, I hear a lot about, ĎThis carís no good,í or ĎI need a different setup,í but no matter what, as a driver, you can always do a better job.

    TrackHQ: When you coach NASCAR drivers for racing on road courses, what points do you try to emphasize?
    Boris Said: I really depends. Itís a case-by-case basis. To them itís a different discipline. A lot of them tried drive a road course like an oval. You really have to forget a few things. The basics of a road course are different. Once you teach those guys, most of them get it. Theyíre up top, some of the best drivers in the business over there. Theyíre really, really good drivers.

    TrackHQ: Youíve also raced a V8 Supercar, which puts you on the other side of the car. How did you get accustomed to driving on the right-hand side?
    Boris Said: That was probably one of the toughest things when you race a track like Bathurst, which is probably one of the toughest tracks in the world. I put it right up there with Nurburgring. Itís not that long, but itís really technical and itís surrounded by cement walls. Thereís absolutely no room for error.

    Shifting with your left hand wasnít that bad, but having all that car on the left side of you was really, just different. You donít think about how (accustomed) you are of where the space of the car is, and when you have to drive at ten tenths and run really close to the walls. That was a big learning curve for me over there.

    TrackHQ: Will we see you in a V8 Supercar again?
    Boris Said: Yep. Iíll be at Surferís Paradise again this year in the same V.I.P. Pet Foods car. They already signed me up, so Iím excited about that.

    TrackHQ: Can you describe the racing scene in Australia, and how it differs from or how itís similar to the U.S.?
    Boris Said: Itís so similar to NASCAR. Itís like NASCAR, but on road courses in really cool cars. The way they present it, itís their top motorsport over there. The level of competition in that series is second to none in road racing. There isnít a more competitive road race series anywhere in the world. It is amazing how close everybody is and how good they are.

    TrackHQ: Can you go into a bit more detail about the Bathurst track, and how would you rate it compared with all the tracks that youíve driven?
    Boris Said: Iíd say the toughest track Iíve ever driven is the Nurburgring, and part of that is traffic and weather. Bathurst is only 4.5 miles, but in a 2.5 mile section, youíre going up and down almost 1,200 feet in elevationóin a 2.5 mile stretch. TV does not do that place justice. The first time you go around there, you think, ĎI canít believe theyíre racing down this.í Itís as steep as you can ever walk down and youíre racing down it at 100 mph. Conrad Straightaway in a V8 Supercar youíre going 199 mph into flat-out right hand kink, so itís very fast, and very narrow and very technical. Itís just wild.

    TrackHQ: And those are public streets, correct?
    Boris Said: Yes, public roads.

    TrackHQ: Your father raced F1 back in 1959. How much of an influence was he on your career choice?
    Boris Said: Absolutely zero. My dad left when I was 6, so I never saw him till I was about 35. I didnít even know he raced till I started racing, because I have the same name. I learned more about him from racing than I ever knew about him before I started racing.

    TrackHQ: I was not aware of that. If these questions are out of bounds, I apologize.
    Boris Said: No, no, no, itís no big deal. Itís just the hand I was dealt. Itís funny, the thing I always thought about was he was kind of an accomplished race car driver, and I guess when itís in your genes, it really is in your genes.

    TrackHQ: What more would you like to accomplish in racing? What is left on your check list?
    Boris Said: I feel pretty fortunate and proud of what Iíve accomplished. Iíve won in NASCAR Trucks and Iíve won in NASCAR Nationwide, but Iíve never won a NASCAR Sprint Cup race. I know thatís a big goal and no part-time guy has ever done that, but thatís still something I want to do, and Iím going to keep on trying.

    The one thing I wish I could have done, but never got a chance to do was to try a DTM car. I think those are the coolest cars in the world. And now to see Joey Hand, the only American ever to go over there and run full time is great, and I feel really, really proud that he gets to go do that. Hopefully, heís going to kick some ass over there.

    But you know when he started his career in GT cars, we were teammates, so itís pretty neat to see him doing that.

    TrackHQ: What more would you like to accomplish outside of racing?
    Boris Said: I guess my goal outside of racing is to try to be the best car dealer that BMW has ever had, to try to bring service back to America, treat people right and have people say, ĎWow, that was one of the best dealerships Iíve ever been into.í

    And Iím really proud of how it looks. It has a big motorsports presence in it, with the way it looks and is decorated, with driver suits and race car pictures all over the place. Hopefully, I can make this successful.

    TrackHQ: As I mentioned, I posted a thread asking for members to submit questions they wanted to ask you, so letís move on to those right now.

    TrackHQ: Going back to when you were emerging as an amateur standout, what do you remember as being most important when transitioning from club racer to pro racer?
    Boris Said: I guess the most important thing is to really not ever get comfortable where youíre at. I always try to get into something faster and more competitive, and then just keep working on your trade, you know, getting better at it, always being really critical about how youíre driving. How could I have gone through that corner better? Was I on the brake too early? Was I on the brake too late? Could I have gotten on the gas earlier? I still think the same way now as I did then.

    TrackHQ: What do you think of NASCARís efforts to appeal to other markets outside the US. Will they implement enough changes to be successful? How do you see that working for them in the long run?
    Boris Said: I race in Canada in the Montreal race every year and that race is completely packed. Itís as crowded as the F1 race. Do I think itís important for NASCAR to go outside the U.S.? No, because itís like V8 Supercars. Itís huge in Australia, and all the sponsors are from that country. I think NASCAR is America. I think outside of America, people are going to watch because itís entertainment, itís exciting. You never know whoís going to win, you see a lot of crashes. Itís exciting racing. I donít think itís important for NASCAR, personally. I think itís big enough in the states. Itís the biggest form of racing in the United States. I think just making it available outside to other markets, people are going to watch it because it is entertainment.

    I think thatís something the ALMS, they have never gotten. The people who run the ALMS just donít understand what their product is and they donít get it, and itís disappointing for somebody like me, a young American who wishes there was more opportunity for other young Americans, and ALMS doesnít offer that. Itís really down to management and how they run their series.

    TrackHQ: With regard to driving and racing schools, are they worth the money? If so, which school do you recommend?
    Boris Said: I went to the Skip Barber school when I started. Like I said, youíre never too old to learn. If you could, if it were financially feasible, Iíd tell everyone to go to every driving school because I think from all different instructors, anyone you ask, you can always take away something from somebody.

    TrackHQ: How many days a year do you spend driving on a track, whether itís practice or competition?
    Boris Said: Boy, thatís a good question. Iíd say at least 150.

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    TrackHQ: You might have addressed this already, but letís just go ahead as if you hadnít. Describe the hairiest racing moment you can recall. Where did it happen? What were you driving and what happened?
    Boris Said: I was testing the Panoz, the front engine P1 car they used to have. I had a bad testing crash at Road Atlanta (backward into the overpass bridge at Turn 11 after a half-shaft broke). I woke up in the hospital with a fractured skull. That was probably one of the worst crashes I ever had and one of the longest to recover from. It happened a week after I clinched the Trans Am championship in 2002.

    It was a scary thing because when you look at pictures of the car, you think, ĎOh, that guy didnít make it.í

    Then I had an incident a couple of years ago in Long Beach when I was driving a Corvette in the ALMS. With a couple of laps left to go, it just burst into flames. Normally, when you have a bad crash, you wake up somewhere and you donít remember it. But this was an incident where it just burst into flames going down the straightaway and for 18.5 seconds I was on fireóand it was hot. Youíre lucid the whole way. It was a weird thing, going through something like that, how every decision you make really has a big effect on whatís going to happen. So that could have gone bad pretty easily. Luckily it didnít.

    TrackHQ: There are some infamous videos on YouTube between you and Greg Biffle from incident at Watkins Glen last year? Can you talk about that?
    Boris Said: That was just something that happened on track that shouldnít have happened, and I felt I was in the right. He felt he was in the right. It just happens sometimes. He was mad at me because he thought I was driving too hard and Iím not a regular, and because Iím not a regular, I should drive easier. I totally disagree with that because the team I was driving for didnít hire me to drive at 80 percent. They expect 100 percent. I mean, he was having a bad day, but it was just one of those deals. It got a lot more press than it probably should have.

    TrackHQ: What cars did you own/drive when you started in your career?
    Boris Said: I started with Showroom Stock Mustang GT that I used to drive to the track. Then from there I got a Camaro and did three years at the runoffs in an í89 Chevy Camaro. From there I did CORCA Challenge and started to get rides in the Firehawk Series and World Challenge, which I think was called something different back then, Escort Endurance Series. Thatís kind of where I started.

    TrackHQ: What were the cars you loved most, to race?
    Boris Said: You know, for me, it was anything. I just liked racing. It didnít matter what I got in. It all seemed fun. I donít care if itís go kart, a showroom stock Camaro, a front-wheel drive Honda. Iíve driven almost every kind of closed-wheel car imaginable. I donít think thereís any I havenít driven.

    I think the Trans Am series in the past was one of the most fun series, best cars. They were high horsepower, they sounded good, you can beat and bang each other a little bit without stuff flying off of them, and the length of the races was really good. That was probably the best series.

    TrackHQ: Do you have favorite road course? A track you just love most?
    Boris Said: In America or anywhere?

    TrackHQ: Weíll do one of each. Start with America and then overseas.
    Boris Said: In America, I love Road America.

    TrackHQ: What do you love about it?
    Boris Said: Oh, itís just fast, itís got a lot of good corners. The people are really friendly there, so I think itís a tossup between Road America and Watkins Glen. I could go to both those every week and be happy.

    And then overseas, for sure, itís Nurburgring.

    TrackHQ: Describe your first win and then, of course, most memorable win?
    Boris Said: My first win was in an SS GT Mustang, so that was a long time ago. But my most memorable wins, the Nationwide race a couple of years ago in Montreal where it was the closest finish ever, that was pretty memorable. Winning my first NASCAR truck race was memorable. The Nurburgring was probably the most memorable because I feel like a pretty patriotic guy, and that was pretty neat. But every win has some kind of meaning you always cherish or remember.

    TrackHQ: Who inspires you most?
    Boris Said: I think originally when I started it was Hans Stuck. I remember seeing him when I first started racing, race those four-wheel-drive Audis and Porsches and I thought, ĎMan, that guy is a god. If I can be like anybody, I want to be like Hans Stuck.í

    And Dale Earnhardt Sr. I watched stock car racing on TV and there was just something about the way he drove and his attitude, and I just thought that guy was bad ass. So those two are the biggest influences.

    And so as fate turned out, I ended up being one of only four people who have ever driven the black No. 3 car at a test when Dale Earnhardt asked me to drive his car and sort it out for him. That was a big deal. (The other three were Paul Newman, Jeff Green and Neil Bonnett).

    Then Hans Stuck and I were teammates for four or five years and heís the godfather of my kid. Itís funny how things work out, but those two guys were the biggest influence on my career.

    TrackHQ: That must be something, to become peers with people who were once your heroes.
    Boris Said: Exactly. Itís just something I never thought, that Iíd make it that far in the first place. Every year I race I tap myself on the shoulder. I didnít think it would ever take me this far or Iíd ever get this far, or Iíd ever get to drive this many cool cars. And to meet all the people Iíve gotten to meet, itís been an amazing ride.

    TrackHQ: What is your current daily driver?
    Boris Said: BMW X6 M.

    TrackHQ: The Mazda Miata, have you ever driven one?
    Boris Said: Yep. I was supposed to race one at Daytona a few years ago in the Continental Challenge race, and practiced it. I think we were like second in practice and the co-driver wrote it off in qualifying, so I never actually raced it.

    TrackHQ: Do you think the Miata is a girls car?
    Boris Said: No, it actually handles really good.

    TrackHQ: Have you ever raced or driven a Honda S2000
    Boris Said: Uh, no.

    TrackHQ: So if you had to choose one, an S2000 or a Miata, which would you pick?
    Boris Said: S2000. They used to have a racing league on the West Coast that would always be racing when we were racing Corvette Challenge. I mean, those cars look fantastic. They look like fast go karts.

    TrackHQ: TrackHQ members club race against friends, which is very different that racing at the pro level. We like to talk smack to each other, race hard and clean but always remain friends at the end of the day. Do you have or can you share any tricks either on track or in the paddock that you use to play friendly mind games with your opponents before a race?
    Boris Said: Thatís no different from pro racing. Iím sure itís the same in Formula 1. Those guys hack on each other. The racing community isnít that big. Iíll tell you, when I first went to Australia to run a V8 Supercar, those guys race harder than anybody, and their hospitality, they all eat under the same tent. So one minute theyíre out there punting each other off the road and then you see them eating together, saying, ĎAh mate, you f@*king had me off, you f@*king c@*t, what the f@*k?í Theyíre laughing about it and eating together and drinking at night, and I always thought that was pretty cool.

    And in NASCAR you see the same thing. Greg Biffle and I, we were friends, and then you get in an on-track fight and you hack about it, so itís no different from club racing. None at all. Even my friends, we go to the go-kart track, itís the same thing. You just want to make fun of each other, laugh a little bit, and do your best.

    Getting in somebodyís head, it really just depends on the person. Basically, you just try to find what irritates them and then you use that. Thatís kind of the way we do it (laughs).

    TrackHQ: What is the one car you would be racing today if your only goal was to have fun?
    Boris Said:It would probably be the Class 1 BMW M5-motor buggy I drove at the Baja 1000. That was one of the most fun things Iíve ever done.

    TrackHQ:Most race drivers arenít 6í4Ē. How does he work around driving in a small cockpit?
    Boris Said: You basically learn to crunch up. Itís too bad, but thatís just the way life is. It sucks, but the fun outweighs being a little uncomfortable sometimes.

    TrackHQ: Does your height come into play when you are selecting team drivers for endurance races?
    Boris Said: Itís affected me a few times, where I couldnít get in. For me, right now, to get in that Rahal car, in the current ALMS car, I probably couldnít fit because of the seat, the way they have it in there, but yeah, that has happened a few times over the years, but not many because most cars, I say, ĎLook, it doesnít matter. Iíll fit in. Wherever the seat is, Iíll make it work.í That hasnít been that big a deal.

    TrackHQ: I have one last yes-or-no question for you: Do you abstain from alcohol the night before a race?
    Boris Said: Yes. Iím not a big drinker anyway.

    TrackHQ: This has been a real treat. I appreciate the time you have given me, and your patience and your candor. It really means a lot. Thank you.

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    LongWinded National Champ Bueller's Avatar
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    Now see if you can setup a trackhq vs boris track day. Better yet, a race. Liking your new rookie plate avatar.
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    Senior Member fleadh's Avatar
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    Boris rules. Thanks for getting the interview and posting it up for us!

    If I'm ever in the market for a BMW I know where I'll be heading..

    -mike

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    Great interview! A little disappointed my question about chopping an onion did not make the cut.

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    Yay, a bunch of my questions ended up in the interview.

    Thanks for doing this Brett! That was pretty cool of him taking 20-30min of his day to do this interview. Brett, did you get the chance to meet him in person?
    Zhong (Evo IX)
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  9. #9
    Administrator ucfbrett's Avatar
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    I thought it was generous of him, too. We did the interview by phone, and it took about 40 minutes.

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    BMW Master bawareca's Avatar
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    We can only respect people that remember where it all started

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    The execution of this interview was even better than the (great) idea to have it in the first place.

    First rate questions and really stellar responses.

    Much appreciated.

  12. #12
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    btw: Someone should find a way to let him drive his S2000 someday.
    Last edited by Loose Caboose; 04-26-2012 at 06:04 PM.
    ucfbrett likes this.

  13. #13
    Senior Member fatbillybob's Avatar
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    Thanks to Brett and Boris! This was the best read of the day. I hope there is a future part 2.

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    Not Certified Slow SDSUsnowboards's Avatar
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    Wow. That is a GOOD interview. Well done!

    +1 for saying 'hairiest' racing moment. Hahaha.
    Neocataboi likes this.
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    Senior Member robburgoon's Avatar
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    I guess boris never heard of trackHQ?

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    Senior Member Johnny_Se7en's Avatar
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    Question for the forum: Who would win in a celebrity death match, Chuck Noris or Boris Said?
    If nothing happens and there is no one around why did it not happen?

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    Administrator ucfbrett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by robburgoon View Post
    I guess boris never heard of trackHQ?
    He has now.

  18. #18
    Administrator ucfbrett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loose Caboose View Post
    The execution of this interview was even better than the (great) idea to have it in the first place.

    First rate questions and really stellar responses.

    Much appreciated.
    Thanks for the feedback. I am interested in doing more like it. Interviewing is one of my favorite things to do.

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    Thanks Brett and Boris,

    Brett, you really did a fantastic job. Great questions, Great interview

    I thoroughly enjoyed it.

  20. #20
    Super Duper Member redtopz's Avatar
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    Excellent interview! Fun to read. "Do you think a miata is a girls car?" .

    Interesting how highly he speaks of the nascar drivers. Also interesting choices for favorite tracks.
    1999 C5 Corvette Nasa ST2 #78

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