+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 49
Like Tree70Likes

Thread: Porsche Driving Challenge

  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Rolling Hills Estates
    Posts
    3,003
    Liked
    887 times

    Default

    Hope you get the new 787 Dreamliner.

    It is pressurized to 6,000 feet (instead of 8,000 ft.) and, along with its higher humidity, really make a difference on a long flight. Plus it has far better air filtration that can capture bacteria and allergens so that you arrive fully functional.

    Wikipedia excerpt:
    The internal cabin pressure of the 787 is increased to the equivalent of 6,000 feet (1,800 m) altitude instead of the 8,000 feet (2,400 m) on older conventional aircraft.[243] According to Boeing, in a joint study with Oklahoma State University, this will significantly improve passenger comfort.[188][244] Cabin air pressurization is provided by electrically driven compressors, rather than traditional engine-bleed air, thereby eliminating the need to cool heated air before it enters the cabin.[245][246] The cabin's humidity is programmable based on the number of passengers carried, and allows 15% humidity settings instead of the 4% found in previous aircraft.[243] The composite fuselage avoids metal fatigue issues associated with higher cabin pressure, and eliminates the risk of corrosion from higher humidity levels.[243] The cabin air-conditioning system improves air quality by removing ozone from outside air, and besides standard HEPA filters which remove airborne particles, uses a gaseous filtration system to remove odors, irritants, and gaseous contaminants as well as particulates like viruses, bacteria and allergens.[179][237] The bleedless engine cabin air system also allows the 787 air to avoid oil fumes and toxins which are dangerous to the health of passengers and crew and are found in all other aircraft bleed air systems.[247]
    Last edited by Loose Caboose; 02-24-2016 at 05:14 PM.

  2. #22
    enjoys driving fast Jack Olsen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    533
    Liked
    380 times

    Default

    No such luck. It's a 777-300ER, currently above Salt Lake City (or thereabouts). I'm the guy studying Weissach test track videos.

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Rolling Hills Estates
    Posts
    3,003
    Liked
    887 times

  4. #24
    Senior Member CharleyH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    410
    Liked
    241 times

    Default

    Ummm, I thought Jack was going to Weissach. This looks like Hokenheim.

    This is Weissach....

    One Lap of Weissach Video Clip

    Attachment 9865



    Attachment 9865[/QUOTE]

  5. #25
    enjoys driving fast Jack Olsen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    533
    Liked
    380 times

    Default

    I'm in Heathrow right now for a stopover on the way back home -- eagerly awaiting the moment when my non-disclosure agreement allows me to talk about the last five days.

    But I don't think I'll spoil anything by saying I had a GREAT time.

  6. #26
    Administrator ucfbrett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ventura, Calif.
    Posts
    5,639
    Liked
    2356 times

    Default

    When does the NDA end?

  7. #27
    Chest hair required Olitho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,235
    Liked
    2343 times

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ucfbrett View Post
    When does the NDA end?
    He can't tell you that!
    ucfbrett, bawareca and slodrew like this.
    To the right of The Sheriff. Isn't everyone?

  8. #28
    Senior Member Johnny_Se7en's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    The Orange Curtain
    Posts
    1,198
    Liked
    145 times

    Default

    I'll wait for it to post on the Porsche YouTube channel.
    If nothing happens and there is no one around why did it not happen?

  9. #29
    enjoys driving fast Jack Olsen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    533
    Liked
    380 times

    Default

    It ends now. Here's a start:

    A link to the official site: Principle of Purity. The new 911 R. | Porsche USA



    The first stamp on the new passport. Not a bad start for a February weekend.

    The 'new model' is the 991 911R. 500 hp. 6-speed manual. Lighter than the GT3 RS.


    Here's what the weekend was all about. Big power. No wing. Old-school 6-speed transaxle. And it went on a diet.


    The 'challenge' is a series of training exercises for me and (a German guy named) Alven with Patrick Long, building up to (next month) getting to drive one stage of the 'Tour de France Automobile' hillclimb that was won by the original 911R model.


    The only American to become a Werks Driver for Porsche and also a very generous and gracious guy.


    The real purpose of my visit was to put together a set of online promotional clips for the 911R. So in one sense, the weekend was spent making a commercial. As such, it's important to point out that the version of me in the clips is fictional. I'm pretending to be a driver who's happy to learn what understeer is and how to heel-and-toe downshift. In reality, I've been heel-and-toeing for 16 years. But fact and fiction are two different things. The point is to introduce the 911R, not to introduce me.

    But the other part of the reality of this weekend was spending two days with the motorsports, GT program, and marketing people from Porsche at the Weissach R&D facility -- which we all know as the hallowed grounds where for decades Porsche's great race cars have been tested and developed. It's also the place where an inch-thick stack of approvals (and non-disclosure agreements) had to be signed so that I could see some of the things I saw and actually drive on the legendary test track.



    Here's my 'mugshot.' I'm not sure how I got the designation 'creative,' but I'll take it.


    Because of the nature of shooting this kind of thing involves a lot of waiting for the camera crew to set up the next shot, maybe the most memorable part of the weekend was the idle time spent with Patrick Long, and also a guy from the GT program who had overseen the development of the 911R, and also one other Porsche-employed driver (who wasn't part of the on-screen drama, but helped with the coaching and filming). It would be one thing to get a few minutes with these guys as part of a press event or factory tour, but it was another thing altogether to just hang out and talk with them through a long day and then a long dinner afterwards. I can only talk about some of it, but to get two driver's impressions of the current race scene, and what it's really like to drive Le Mans, and what it's like to drive with and hear about other drivers, some newand up-and-coming, some underrated, some overrated, some nice, some not. And to also hear about the development of the 911R project from an internal point of view. It's something I'll never forget.


    The lanyard you get for the track gate to open at Weissach.


    This was the track map I made for myself. On the flight out, I spent time going through lap videos with this. I think the person in front of me was probably annoyed by my simulated use of his seat-back for the throttle and brake -- but he didn't complain.


    There were also moments where I wanted to pinch myself to make sure I wasn't dreaming -- when they tell you that a shot is going to take a while, so they're bringing out a GT3 RS out so you can kill some time driving it on the test track. I don't know how many non-professionals have ever been allowed out on that track (I think Leipzig is where that sort of thing is usually done) -- but right now, I think it's safe to say that I'm one of the few people who can tell you what driving the new 911R and the GT3 RS back-to-back on the Weissach track is like.

    I still can't believe it all happened.



    This is the final part of the project -- running a stage from the 1969 Tour de France Automobile, which was won by a 911R back in the day.


    If anyone has any questions, I'll answer them (as much as my NDA with Porsche will allow, at least). And I'll also write up more specific impressions about the 911R soon.

  10. #30
    Senior Member slodrew's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    San Luis Obispo, Ca.
    Posts
    230
    Liked
    73 times

    Default

    ucfbrett likes this.

  11. #31
    Senior Member vantagesc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    174
    Liked
    3 times

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Olsen View Post
    The real purpose of my visit was to put together a set of online promotional clips for the 911R. So in one sense, the weekend was spent making a commercial. As such, it's important to point out that the version of me in the clips is fictional. I'm pretending to be a driver who's happy to learn what understeer is and how to heel-and-toe downshift. In reality, I've been heel-and-toeing for 16 years. But fact and fiction are two different things. The point is to introduce the 911R, not to introduce me.
    Very cool Jack! Interesting that a commercial for a driver's car would be associated with someone being inexperienced with driving. Guess will have to see it.

    Very simple question then: Which did you like better between the GT3 RS and R? I don't think newer cars really match the driver involvement of older cars for a variety of reasons, but did the R move you emotionally?
    '05 Lotus Elise
    '16 Porsche Cayman GT4

  12. #32
    Administrator ucfbrett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ventura, Calif.
    Posts
    5,639
    Liked
    2356 times

    Default

    What a *****in' car and a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Congratulations, Jack. Oh, and let me add this:

  13. #33
    enjoys driving fast Jack Olsen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    533
    Liked
    380 times

    Default

    Thanks! Here are my driving impressions -- especially between the GT3 RS and the 911R.

    Obviously, it has less downforce and narrower tires than the GT3 RS. They put a diffuser in back, but I'm not sure how functional a piece like that is in corners, where body roll compromises its function. I believe they had to make some changes to the underbody kit up front to keep front and rear axle numbers compatible. I believe there is also a different (and more 'lively') programming for the rear steering on this model -- although I haven't seen that mentioned in the official literature.

    Compared to the early 911 I'm used to driving, it's a very sure-footed car. But compared to the GT3 RS, up at speed, it's a lot more lively and engaging. The differences from aero are only going to be a factor in faster corners. But the tire-size differences and (possibly) rear-steering-programming differences give it a nimbler feel even in medium-speed corners. It's something you can toss around more easily than the GT3 RS (although again, all things are relative -- by 2400-lb 1972 is another animal altogether).

    I liked that it was a 6-speed and not a 7-speed manual gearbox. I believe the gearing is lower than other manual transmissions Porsche makes (although, again, that might be incorrect -- I don't see it in the official literature). There is nothing faster than the paddles in the GT3 RS. But for driving in any kind of street situation, it makes (for me, at least) a better tactile experience to be using my right hand to upshift and downshift. It auto-blips downshifts in sport mode, but you can defeat that if you want to go for the full-on old-school feel.

    The weight difference between the 911R and the GT3 RS is something I'd be hard-pressed to say I felt. Both are light by contemporary standards (and also heavy, relative to the 911 I drive). But I'm very happy to see Porsche making a new model that's lighter, and I hope they make good on their talk about getting out of the horsepower arms race and finding ways to reduce the weight (and size, if all my dreams came true) of future models. Modern Porsches feel very light on the track, because of the sophistication of their suspension systems. But I'd be thrilled to see them become actually lighter. There's no substitute for reduced mass when you take a car through a corner.

    So which car would I own if I had the money and an allocation? It's not easy to answer. Porsche makes it clear that it does not see the 911R as primarily a track car. I don't think the half-cage is even an option on it. And if I were going to the track with one of these cars as often as I do with my 1972 911, then the GT3 RS would be my choice. You are either faster or slower on a track, and the GT3 RS is phenomenally rewarding to drive in those conditions. The paddles just amaze you as you go up or down. Everything about the car is positive.

    For recreational street driving and even trips out with your wife, the 911R would be the easy winner. It's just so much fun to drive. There's more personality to its 'tossability' and rowing through the gears on a canyon road is a fundamentally different experience than tapping paddles. And while I fully understand the value of a big wing in 80+-mph corners, it's a different experience when you pull into a restaurant, where people might (in some way) lump you with the type of drivers to bolt wings to their Civics. Having no tail looks cleaner. It shows off the lines of the car better. And my wife would probably agree to sit in it.

    Along those lines, I would say that the 911R would absolutely make a viable daily driver. Granted, I drive a 1972 911 with a cage around town, so my comfort level is pretty broad. But it's comfortable, not too loud (there's an exhaust button for when you want the sound to echo off the mountains), and it hasn't been stripped out so much that it feels unsafe or flimsy. It's got all that going for it -- and then it will feel a little more nimble and driver-controllable (if that makes sense) than the GT3 RS would on ordinary roads. So again, if I was a guy who was going to go to the track once a year but drive around my favorite roads more often, the 911R would be a Porsche that would be more rewarding, for me, connecting the heritage of the old cars with the technology of the new ones.

  14. #34
    The Real Captain Slow Red_5's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Santa Barbara
    Posts
    4,332
    Liked
    763 times

    Default

    Very cool experience I'm sure. I am a little disappointed in the direction Porsche seems to be headed by building these limited production cool cars and offering them first to 918 owners. I can't afford one either way but it also reduces my lust for the car and the brand.
    bawareca likes this.
    99 Mazda Miata SuperMiata #515 - AKA Sparky SOLD
    '91 Mariner Blue Miata project AKA Napoleon

  15. #35
    Senior Member robburgoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    7,008
    Liked
    1493 times

    Default

    "So in one sense, the weekend was spent making a commercial. As such, it's important to point out that the version of me in the clips is fictional. I'm pretending to be a driver who's happy to learn what understeer is and how to heel-and-toe downshift. In reality, I've been heel-and-toeing for 16 years."

    Yeah...

    Well at least you got to beat on a GT3 on a race track. If they didn't have anyone nannying you for that, that's worth the trip right there.
    bawareca likes this.

  16. #36
    Senior Member vantagesc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    174
    Liked
    3 times

    Default

    Thanks Jack. I even daily drive my GT4 (not self-conscious about looking like a douche with the wing anymore), so I am not surprised the 911R is so streetable. That seems to be a requirement these days for any manufacturer short of Ariel and Caterham.

    Though, after my visit to Germany in October, I realized just how poor our roads are in Los Angeles sometimes. I'm sure even a Cup car would ride just fine in Germany.
    Last edited by vantagesc; 03-01-2016 at 05:12 PM.
    '05 Lotus Elise
    '16 Porsche Cayman GT4

  17. #37
    Senior Member KJSCV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Valencia
    Posts
    138
    Liked
    89 times

    Default

    That's so great.. what a wonderful experience

  18. #38
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Rolling Hills Estates
    Posts
    3,003
    Liked
    887 times

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CharleyH View Post
    Ummm, I thought Jack was going to Weissach. This looks like Hokenheim.

    This is Weissach....

    One Lap of Weissach Video Clip
    Attachment 9865

    Attachment 9865
    [/QUOTE]

    Thanks!

    - and "sorry" for the sloppy search/post.

  19. #39
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    2
    Liked
    0 times

    Default

    Hey Jack, amazing write-up and congrats. I'm sure it wasn't the only deciding factor in your selection (considering your previous notoriety) but is there any chance you could post your submission video for us to see? I'm sure plenty of people entered this thing without realizing that being a Porsche semi-internet celebrity was a prerequisite (myself included)! Regardless, you earned it. Thanks.

  20. #40
    enjoys driving fast Jack Olsen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    533
    Liked
    380 times

    Default

    Well, here's the first video where you get to watch me acting (ouch!) and driving (fun!).

    (Click on the picture to see the video.)


+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts