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Thread: BMW could be all wet - or at least partially wet.

  1. #1
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    Default BMW could be all wet - or at least partially wet.

    10% power increase, and an 8% increase in effieciency, with best gains for "sporty" drivers.

    And I wonder if one of the benefits is higher compression that is made possible by reduced combustion temperature?

    BMW Shows Off More Vehicles With Power-Boosting Water Injection
    Last edited by Loose Caboose; 07-05-2015 at 12:16 PM.

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    AROSC Comp. Director Slaysman's Avatar
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    At first, I was concerned that CA might put a water tax on them due to our drought, but it sounds like you can hook the car up to your sprinkler system. It all sounds too good to be true. Where is the catch?
    Terry Watson
    AROSC Competition Director

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    Senior Member fatbillybob's Avatar
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    Well when you look at the advancements and bullet proofness of urea injection systems, water injection is a logical step. I am surprised someone has not developed an oem system sooner.

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    Senior Member Johnny_Se7en's Avatar
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    This should be interesting, depending on the source and purity water can cost more than gas.
    If nothing happens and there is no one around why did it not happen?

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    Master of Disaster SteveLevin's Avatar
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    Something in the back of my mind says that the second generation turbo Corvairs came with water injection, but I could be wrong.

    Steve

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    AROSC Comp. Director Slaysman's Avatar
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    In the early 60's, GM built some 215 cu. in. turbo engines for Buick, Olds & Pontiac. My college roommate had one, and I believe it had water injection from the factory.
    Terry Watson
    AROSC Competition Director

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    BMW Master bawareca's Avatar
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    Nazi aircraft engines at the end of WWII had a blowers and water injection too, BMW is closing the circle now
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    So let me get this straight. In 2015, BMW is hawking as new technology something that GM gave up in the 1960s, and the phucking Nazis used in WWII?
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    BMW Master bawareca's Avatar
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    Who said it's new? I have it in my car for more than 5 years

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    Quote Originally Posted by bawareca View Post
    Nazi aircraft engines at the end of WWII had a blowers and water injection too, BMW is closing the circle now


    American aircraft were really big on water meth injection!

    War emergency power

    "Maximum normal power would be limited by a mechanical stop, for instance a wire across the throttle lever slot, but a more forceful push would break the wire, allowing extra power. In normal service, the P-51H Mustang was rated at 1,380 hp, but WEP would deliver up to 2,218 hp.[3] In the P-51D Mustang, the model most produced and used during WWII, the WEP increased the HP from 1490 to 1720. The Vought F4U Corsair, not originally equipped for WEP, later boasted a power increase of up to 410 hp (17%) when WEP was engaged.[2] Several methods were used to boost engine power by manufacturers, including water injection and methanol-water injection."
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    Master of Disaster SteveLevin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard EVO View Post
    So let me get this straight. In 2015, BMW is hawking as new technology something that GM gave up in the 1960s, and the phucking Nazis used in WWII?
    Well, to be fair, some of the last of the aircraft piston engines designs had quite impressive hp/cubic inch given that their designs were set from the 1940s.

    The Wright R-3350 (3,350 cubic inches) was rated for something like 3,000hp. And while not at full power, it was normal to use 75% of that for hours on end, for example, crossing the Atlantic.

    And it weighed only a bit over a ton -- meaning the power output was also over 1hp/lb engine weight.

    Steve "yes, I'm an aviation dork"
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveLevin View Post
    Well, to be fair, some of the last of the aircraft piston engines designs had quite impressive hp/cubic inch given that their designs were set from the 1940s.

    The Wright R-3350 (3,350 cubic inches) was rated for something like 3,000hp. And while not at full power, it was normal to use 75% of that for hours on end, for example, crossing the Atlantic.

    And it weighed only a bit over a ton -- meaning the power output was also over 1hp/lb engine weight.

    Steve "yes, I'm an aviation dork"
    Cool! the Wright R3350's used "power recovery turbines" or "turbo compounding" on Lockheed constellations.
    Why bother a with a fussy compressor turbine and heating the intake charge when you can just have the exhaust turbine "help" turn the crankshaft!!


    40.jpg


    There was a prototype Allison that produces over 3000hp using this technology:

    Allison V-1710 Turbo-Compound

    turbocompound.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveLevin View Post
    Steve "yes, I'm an aviation dork"
    I guess that says it all . . .
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    The deposed former Sheriff of trackHQ . . .

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    The GM cars with the turbo 215 used a half and half mixture of distilled water and methyl alcohol (and called it "Turbo Rocket Fluid") and ran a 10.25:1 compression ratio with 5psi of boost. The system had an automatic shutoff if the fluid reservoir ran dry and prevented the car from going into boost.

    I only had to look up some of that. I have a Range Rover Classic, which means I've looked for more power more than once.

    As far as water injection goes, if it truly is kept up by A/C condensation collection, good on them. If it requires topping up, it's not going to work very well in a country where even something essential like brake fluid is checked every few years and changed every decade.
    Steve C.
    1992 Nissan 240SX
    Sub-2200lbs, stock with bolt-ons, Blackbird cage
    1998 BMW M3/4/5 Bostongrun/Modena 62k miles

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