+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 50
Like Tree3Likes

Thread: Anyone ride bikes?

  1. #1
    Member heelntoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    N/A
    Posts
    85
    Liked
    19 times

    Default Anyone ride bikes?

    Just wondering if any of you track rats ride bikes on the street/track? I have always been in awe of bikes but have stayed away due to them lowering life expectancy exponentially. They seem like too much fun/$ recently and I have started educating myself on them. I would consider getting a 600 for summer and possibly try a trackday or two. My plan is to take the motorcycle training course this summer and buy one next summer.

    Any comments, feedback, advice?

    PS. If this plan comes to fruition, I will be riding only with full gear. Not interested in becoming a human crayon...

  2. #2
    Senior Member bellwilliam's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    La Verne, California, United States
    Posts
    7,644
    Liked
    2282 times

    Default

    Had one but wifey made me sell it.
    Probably a good idea

    There is a saying, something like

    Car is flesh wrapped inside steel
    Motorcycle is steel wrapped inside flesh.
    Last edited by bellwilliam; 05-14-2012 at 11:09 PM.
    Supermiata S1, SuperMiata S2, Supermiata S3
    13 Tesla, ma: no engine !!
    17 GT350 !!
    08 M3 - Carmax warranty !!
    96 NSX
    06 EVO MR
    15 Mini Cooper S

  3. #3
    Not Certified Slow SDSUsnowboards's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Orange County
    Posts
    1,717
    Liked
    742 times

    Default

    I applaud the sentiment but riding with full gear sucks. You are sitting on top of a motor and heat rises. You are also standing on black asphalt that is radiating heat in the summer months. I am not making the argument that you should not wear full gear, but do consider what sacrifice you will have to make to ride a bike as safe as possible. I would recommend not using any sort of synthetic material. Use leather.

    Taking the MSF course is a good idea, and I'm glad you plan to.

    I would begin on a 250cc 4 cyl or a 600cc 2 cylinder bike if you have no prior experience with motorcycles in any form. It's not so much a matter of throttle control as it is a matter of the extreme level of touchiness supersport bikes have regarding literally any input (brake, steering, throttle). Used bikes hold their value fairly well, so you will probably break about even when its time to step up.

    I recommend buying the stickiest tires you can for the street in order to enable more grip when you need it during emergency maneuvers mid-corner. When I was riding some years ago that was the Michelin Pilots.

    I never tracked a bike so I have no advice for that. I plan to have a track bike in the future, and I'll probably be asking you for input by then.

    I can recommend two books. I read them before getting on a bike and I think they helped me stay alive despite my youthful indiscretion.
    Proficient Motorcycling by David L. Hough
    More Proficient Motorcycling by David L. Hough
    Last edited by SDSUsnowboards; 05-14-2012 at 11:21 PM.
    DutchOven likes this.
    2001 MR2-Eleven
    Experience Points: 21
    Youtube Channel.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Gian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Ventura
    Posts
    1,200
    Liked
    464 times

    Default

    I do recomend starting in the dirt. You learn a lot at a much slower speeds. The bigest lesson id how to fall with out getting hurt as much. I love bikes, and started racing them before cars.
    But after a big exit on turn 9 at willow and a 3 week stay in the hospital. I started racing cars. I've been off the track a few more times then I would like to admit in a car, and not one visit to the hospital...

    But I still ride an FZ1 almost daily. Leather and padding is the beat protection. Oh and good judgement. Track days are still better then riding fast on the streets. You only have to worry about yourself and other guys on track, Not cars or animals darting out in front of you.

  5. #5
    Administrator ucfbrett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ventura, Calif.
    Posts
    5,449
    Liked
    2243 times

    Default

    I sold my last bike seven years ago after our second child was born, partly out of a sense of mortality, but also because I could only ride on weekends, which meant leaving mama and the kids at home after not having seen them all week. I used the proceeds from the sale of the bike to buy a Miata. I only miss the bike sometimes, but not enough to get another.

    Full gear is a good idea, as is educating yourself. Read the books. Take the classes.

  6. #6
    dirty smack talker hakeem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    3,076
    Liked
    977 times

    Default

    Pretty much the same story as everyone else here...I get the same thrill from cars, but with a nice big cage surrounding me.

  7. #7
    Senior Member pucsicsal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    597
    Liked
    97 times

    Default

    I don't even want to try riding someone else's street bike.. Because I know if I do I will get addiced and have to buy one soon after that. Out of sight, out of mind.
    robburgoon likes this.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    10,979
    Liked
    1477 times

    Default

    I had a street bike once when I was about 20. I used it as daily transportation for about 6 months. Really sucked when it rained. One night taking a left turn at an intersection, I laid the bike down and damaged it, and scared myself. I repaired it and then sold it right away. Have never ridden a bike, or wanted to, ever since. I think those guys I see racing motorcycles at 160 mph at WSIR with one knee on the ground are insane.

    One time I was talking to a guy who worked the grounds at Buttonwillow, and he said "next weekend, motorcycles -- oh boy, lots of crashes!" And by the way, those guys that split lanes on the freeway, going 25+ mph faster than the cars, know what their lives are worth.
    The deposed former Sheriff of trackHQ . . .

    2006 Porsche 997 Carerra Coupe 6-MT - daily driver
    1992 Honda (Acura) NSX 5-MT - classic investment I couldn't resist and occasionally drive
    2004 Honda S2000 AP2 6-MT - track day car
    2006 Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution IX MR 6-MT - when I need a backseat, 4-doors, or a real trunk, and still want to haul ass . . .

  9. #9
    http://www.trackhq.com/Banners/yellowsitesponsor.gif emilio700's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    3,628
    Liked
    2398 times

    Default

    I rode motorcycles, sport bikes for a while in the 80's. I gave it up because I couldn't get my self to ride them slow. I loved the feeling of the bike squirming at the limit of traction. That was fun. That was also guaranteed to put you on the pavement now and then. I didn't like riding them slow so I sold it and went back to my first passion, cars.

    In the city, they're great for maneuverability and utility and low cost per mile. They're also a bit stressful to ride in the city because cars either don't see you or see you and don't care. To be safer around other vehicles, you quickly learn to ride as if you are invisible. Even when you make eye contact with a driver, that just tells the driver that the left turn is OK to make and you see them.

    I rode for years as a messenger in LA traffic. It was like an 8 hour long video game with only one life and constantly changing rules. Great for a young gun type of character but I knew sooner or later it would bend me.

    My advice, do what you are planning on doing. Get good gear and don't skimp. Don't make the bike any faster. Learn how to ride it in a controlled environment with expert instruction. Any monkey can learn how to make it go, stop and turn. It's all too easy to become a statistic when making your first real motorcycle a 140whp rocket capable of 11s quarter miles and 165mph.
    WWW.949RACING.COM
    SuperMiata

    Aside from their cost I never understood why people race them.
    But obviously I just dont get it. -fatbillybob

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Rolling Hills Estates
    Posts
    2,949
    Liked
    855 times

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by heelntoe View Post
    Just wondering if any of you track rats ride bikes on the street/track? I have always been in awe of bikes but have stayed away due to them lowering life expectancy exponentially. They seem like too much fun/$ recently and I have started educating myself on them. I would consider getting a 600 for summer and possibly try a trackday or two. My plan is to take the motorcycle training course this summer and buy one next summer.

    Any comments, feedback, advice?

    PS. If this plan comes to fruition, I will be riding only with full gear. Not interested in becoming a human crayon...
    Way back, I remember that F1 teams frequently recruited drivers from the ranks of Gran Prix motorcyle champions. John Surtees stands out. I am sure that there is a very large overlap of skill sets - and a level of courage that is many, many standard deviations from the mean.

    John Surtees - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  11. #11
    Senior Member Gian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Ventura
    Posts
    1,200
    Liked
    464 times

    Default

    Not many have been sucssesful making the change from 2 to 4 wheels. Motorcycles have a mutitued of lines through a turn, where as on 4 wheel there are 1, 2 possably 3 lines most of the time. So it's not as easy. Though lots have tryed

  12. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Rolling Hills Estates
    Posts
    2,949
    Liked
    855 times

    Default

    Interesting. I guess Surtees was an exception.

    btw: Did M. Schumacher ever actually compete on his track bike after his (temporary) retirement?

  13. #13
    Philosoraptor LagunaBlueS2k's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Glendale, California, United States
    Posts
    242
    Liked
    41 times

    Default

    When I was 16 years old, I use to ride a buddy's old Honda 250cc after school for fun. Being young and dumb, I never checked the condition of the tires and that bit me in the ass. Long story short, the tires were bald, and it rained earlier in the day. I was making a right turn when the bike just slipped out from underneath me. I had hit a patch of wet mud and that was all she wrote. Thankfully I wasn't going too fast and was wearing a helmet. Bashed my knee when I fell with the bike basically on top of me. Thankfully, I didn't break anything, but have not been on a motorcycle since. My knee has never quite been the same either.

    This was probably the best thing to happen to me though, as I probably would have killed myself on a motorcycle, being kind of reckless in my youth.

  14. #14
    Senior Member pucsicsal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    597
    Liked
    97 times

    Default

    I wonder how bikers deal with the risk that we all deem as too high... Do they just not give a sh*t? Or are they so comfortable and feel in control that they feel it's an acceptable risk the same way we accept the risk of racing a car that can crash/catch fire/roll over etc.

  15. #15
    Not Certified Slow SDSUsnowboards's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Orange County
    Posts
    1,717
    Liked
    742 times

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pucsicsal View Post
    I wonder how bikers deal with the risk that we all deem as too high... Do they just not give a sh*t? Or are they so comfortable and feel in control that they feel it's an acceptable risk the same way we accept the risk of racing a car that can crash/catch fire/roll over etc.
    Bikers consider it an acceptable risk. It ultimately hinges on one's trust in oneself. Usually that trust diminishes with age, as we all begin realize we're not as good at everything as we thought we were. This is why I suspect many bikers quit after their first laydown. Trust diminishes, cars begin to look a lot better.
    2001 MR2-Eleven
    Experience Points: 21
    Youtube Channel.

  16. #16

  17. #17
    BMW Master bawareca's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    LA
    Posts
    1,711
    Liked
    641 times

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by emilio700 View Post
    I rode motorcycles, sport bikes for a while in the 80's. I gave it up because I couldn't get my self to ride them slow. I loved the feeling of the bike squirming at the limit of traction. That was fun. That was also guaranteed to put you on the pavement now and then. I didn't like riding them slow so I sold it and went back to my first passion, cars.
    I have always been a fan of the 4 wheels,but at one point in my 20's I just stepped up and bought 80's Kawasaki 750.I've been doing some pretty crazy things and riding with just a short sleeve and even without a helmet.I got away unharmed from a few situations and as much as I like to be my skills that saved me,it was probably the god taking the wheel in the last moment.I sold the bike less than 2 years later and called it a night for the 2 wheels.Here in the US the bike are twice as cheap as in Europe and a few years ago I was seriously considering getting something 600 to 750,but knowing my self well and the hard opposition from my better half helped me to make the correct decision not buying one.But I have a good argument now when wifey gets angry about "racing "stuff

    Quote Originally Posted by emilio700 View Post
    In the city, they're great for maneuverability and utility and low cost per mile. They're also a bit stressful to ride in the city because cars either don't see you or see you and don't care. To be safer around other vehicles, you quickly learn to ride as if you are invisible. Even when you make eye contact with a driver, that just tells the driver that the left turn is OK to make and you see them.
    That is the worst problem of all,and probably the biggest reason I didnt buy another bike.While driving car i can pretty much predict most of the situations and react accordingly even when i am going relatively fast,but still that is flesh wrapped in metal.Many riders are surprised when I move a little bit to give them more room on the freeway,they sure dont expect someone to see them,especially in the mirrors.As a rider i am looking 3 times in the mirrors and over my shoulder when changing lanes,but I am always afraid someday I could take down someone driving between the cars.

  18. #18
    Smack-Talkin' Member J. Tyler's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,991
    Liked
    165 times

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by heelntoe View Post
    Just wondering if any of you track rats ride bikes on the street/track? I have always been in awe of bikes but have stayed away due to them lowering life expectancy exponentially. They seem like too much fun/$ recently and I have started educating myself on them. I would consider getting a 600 for summer and possibly try a trackday or two. My plan is to take the motorcycle training course this summer and buy one next summer.

    Any comments, feedback, advice?

    PS. If this plan comes to fruition, I will be riding only with full gear. Not interested in becoming a human crayon...
    Yes - get an SV650. Don't get a sportbike for your first bike. Even a 600 is WAY too much bike for any beginner. That is like throwing a driving noob into a Formula Mazda or something. It will bite you. My 600RR is 120hp, weighs 360lbs, and lifts the front wheel off the ground at 90mph. A nice used SV650 will be MORE than fast enough for your first bike, they handle great, and most importantly they are easy to ride. Get one, learn on it for a year, sell it for about what you paid for it, then get whatever sportbike you want.

    Actually, better yet, get a dirtbike and learn/slide/crash/fall on that in the dirt before doing it on asphalt. Then get an SV, then sportbike. Learning on dirt is best because you can slide the bike around and learn what locking the front/rear wheel feels like, crashing, jumping, etc without hurting yourself or (more or less) hurting the bike.

    Always wear your gear. High quality leather jacket (Alpinestars or Dainese) and gloves, helmet, and preferably some decent shoes/boots.

    Use common sense, be aware of everything around you. 99% of the motorcycle accidents I've seen over the past few years when I've been keen to take notice of them are because the rider was either 1) not paying attention or 2) doing something stupid.

    I feel perfectly safe tracking my bike. Again, common sense is huge.

  19. #19
    http://www.trackhq.com/Banners/yellowsitesponsor.gif emilio700's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    3,628
    Liked
    2398 times

    Default

    +1 for starting on a dirt bike. Learning how to fling and slide a bike on dirt will teach you more about advanced motorcycle handling and create better instincts than weeks at a riding school for street bikes.
    Riding in the dirt is maybe the bike equivalent of snow driving or autocross for cars.
    WWW.949RACING.COM
    SuperMiata

    Aside from their cost I never understood why people race them.
    But obviously I just dont get it. -fatbillybob

  20. #20
    Senior Member julian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    redondo beach
    Posts
    105
    Liked
    7 times

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SDSUsnowboards View Post
    Bikers consider it an acceptable risk. It ultimately hinges on one's trust in oneself. Usually that trust diminishes with age, as we all begin realize we're not as good at everything as we thought we were. This is why I suspect many bikers quit after their first laydown. Trust diminishes, cars begin to look a lot better.
    i have to disagree there. it's losing trust in other people not in oneself. in general, the older you get the more responsibilities you have, and most people come to the realization that it's not worth the risk to ride.

    had an older 750 yamaha and 450 kawa in michigan, but when i came back to california there was no way i'd want to ride on the street with the idiot drivers around here. everytime i see a bike it's tempting, but i don't want to die. even if i only rode a bike at the track i'd probably take it too close to my limit.

    my friend with dirt bikes took me to the MX track and it was a blast. dirt bikes are the way to go. if you grew up sliding and jumping your bmx or mtn bike around, getting on a MX track is barrels of fun.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts