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Thread: Motul 600 Vs ATE Brake Fluid - Thoughts?

  1. #21
    "Shoe"
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    If you bleed the brakes that frequently, then you will stay closer to the dry boiling point, and may not need a fluid with a higher wet boiling point.. But that takes time and money to frequently bleed your brakes. Personally, I'd rather pay 2X for SRF and not have to bleed my brakes that often to prevent from boiling the fluid and getting a long pedal since SRF has such a high wet boiling point.

    If you aren't getting a long pedal, you're not boiling the fluid. They key is finding the interval (not just laps, but days as well) where your fluid starts to lose performance because the moisture in the lines lowers the fluids performance. That worry is greatly reduced with SRF, and it's worth it to me, it may no be for you, but if your bleeding the fluid 2X more than you would with SRF, you're not saving anything.

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  2. #22
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    I think we're all in agreement that it depends on the car. The issue with the STI and many other street cars (even ones with big brakes and lots of thermal mass and pad area/volume) is the potential to boil fluid, even when new and "dry". That gas doesn't all reabsorb and the only option is to bleed. It's less likely to happen in a Miata where brakes are hardly a worry. With a heavier car like the STI the potential is pretty high to the point where your changing it more often, more often than when wet boil temps matter. Fortunately bleeding brakes is about 15 minutes and $15, and an easy checkbox on a prep sheet.

    If wet boil temps came into play on these cars (long intervals) the SRF might be worth every penny (or double the pennies). If cost wasn't an issue, I might opt for the SRF for the peace mind, especially if the competition stakes are there. Why not? I'm playing on a smaller playground than some of the racers here though.

  3. #23
    Senior Member bellwilliam's Avatar
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    on a race car, where I go through pads every few weekends, wet boiling point isn't important to me. as I bleed them at least every time I change pads.
    but with a street car that I track couple of times per year, wet boiling point is important.
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  4. #24
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    Depends on the car and how quickly you go though pads, but I've found Motul to boil and cause a long pedal after a few weekends when SRF didnt. I've tried a lot of fluids and am sold on SRF. Can't knock it if you haven't tried it and tested the bleed frequency vs long pedal for yourself.

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  5. #25
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    i ran ATE exclusively on my rx7 and rarely had to flush (never had any brake fade, but did it for peace of mind). on my heavier 996tt, OLD ATE did fade quite a bit. switched the motul 600 to try it on the heavier car, much better. was it just replacing the old fluid that helped? probably, but on a heavier car, I can highly recommend the motul as being very impressive.
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