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Thread: brake/clutch bleed tools

  1. #21
    RaceTape Ninja Force McCocken's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markn View Post
    Well crap. Maybe I have it wrong. I'll pop the bleeder on a car today and report back.




    Mark

    Excellent. Maybe I just have bad luck.

    Eyeballs, if you want to try my Motive, message me.

    I mentioned this thread to my wife, who also knows the bleeding protocol. "Honey? Do you have a minute to spare in the garage?" is apparently the tell that says I'm doing brake work. She knows to put on comfortable shoes and bring a beverage.
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    Senior Member GraemeD's Avatar
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    Motive with fluid in the unit, and a mighty-vac. Wrap Teflon tape around threads of bleeders to help seal air from being sucked in. Each time I do a bleed, I do a full flush of all the calipers, and not having to worry about the fluid level save tons of time. Using both really gets a good flow going thru the system and pushes out the most stubborn air bubbles.

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    Senior Member fatbillybob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeD View Post
    Wrap Teflon tape around threads of bleeders to help seal air from being sucked in.
    This is a brake system and never engineered for teflon tape. Teflon is a lubricant and the brakes go through pretty extreme heat cycling. Loosing torque on a bleeder could end badly. I'm pretty sure teflon tape is a bad idea. Check with a real engineer which I am not.

  4. #24
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    Tested tonight on a donor MC. 30 psi was too much. 26.5 held. At 30 psi the seals for the resevoir started to leak but the cap held. IIRC the original gasket did not seal well. I replaced it with a home made gasket that was of larger diameter and thicker than what was supplied. Maybe that is the difference?


    img_4929.jpg


    BTW I do not recommend such high pressures for bleeding. In general I use just enough pressure to get the job done and no more. Most times all that is needed is 10-15 psi.

    Mark
    Last edited by markn; 03-26-2016 at 10:03 PM.
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    Senior Member GraemeD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatbillybob View Post
    This is a brake system and never engineered for teflon tape. Teflon is a lubricant and the brakes go through pretty extreme heat cycling. Loosing torque on a bleeder could end badly. I'm pretty sure teflon tape is a bad idea. Check with a real engineer which I am not.
    Teflon is not effected by brake fluid, hum, what do the high end steel braided lines have as the inner lining?

    With Teflon on the threads, the bleeders are actually tighter, and less prone to backing out. The real seal comes from the pointy end and the seat it sits in. As an added bonus, if you neglect your brake system, the bleeders won't be rusted in.
    Last edited by GraemeD; 03-27-2016 at 07:30 AM.

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    Senior Member fatbillybob's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GraemeD View Post
    Teflon is not effected by brake fluid, hum, what do the high end steel braided lines have as the inner lining?

    With Teflon on the threads, the bleeders are actually tighter, and less prone to backing out. The real seal comes from the pointy end and the seat it sits in.
    I'm not engineer and none have chimed in so I will continue with my line of reasoning. Teflon in brake systems in not the problem. The problem is the application on bleed screws. Good ideas can come with unintended consequences, like brake failure. There is no record of safety using TTape on bleed screws. TTape is a thread sealant. You are correct, a bleeder seals at the conical tip against a like seat in the caliper. Threads hold the proper torque and 2 things happen. Caliper does not leak and bleed screw does not come out. In fact stuff on threads you can prevent the seating of tip to seat while being fooled by no leak. OEM's engineer the bleed screw and caliper to work together throughout an extreme temperature range hundreds of degrees to below zero. TTape is great on my PVC to iron pipe connection but what does it do with more extreme temperature fluctuations and vibrations and with lubricating brake fluid in the mix? OEMs make the bleeder to be compatible with the caliper. If there are leaks or bad thread to caliper interface, it means you got problems like previous owners who over tighten bleed screws and increased runout and increased tolerances. OEMs don’t use anything on bleed screws except metal to metal. “Speedbleeder” is the only one, I know, adding a locktite-like sealant on bleeder threads because of the issue I posted above regarding Rob's bleed method above. Rob’s method is like a modified “speedbleed.” But as anyone who has used speedbleeders the sealant is soluable in brake fluid. That helps to make sure there is full seating of the bleed tip. Ttape certainly will seal from leaks and many prove it works for some heat cycles but the concept of using anything on bleeder threads does not sound safe to me. I think a tip should be taken from OEMs who don't use anything on bleeders. If pressure bleeding properly Ttape is not needed.

    I think of it as a safety issue. Safety for you and safety for me because I’m sharing a racetrack with you.

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    The Real Captain Slow Red_5's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by markn View Post
    Are using the 1100 adapter: Amazon.com: Motive Products 1100 Master Cylinder Adapter: Automotive or the 1111 adapter: Amazon.com: Motive Products 1111 Adapter: Automotive

    Maybe your gauge is off? I have gone as high as 25 psi (1111 adapter) both with compressor air supply and the Motiv pump without issues.

    Mark
    I had problems with pressure over 10 psi or so with fluid leaking out of the bottom of the reservoir too. I keep my Motive at around 8psi and had no problems. I my first Motive pump went bad and had to replace it. Seems like it wore out pretty quickly considering it might have been used 30 times before it died.
    99 Mazda Miata SuperMiata #515 - AKA Sparky SOLD
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    Senior Member GraemeD's Avatar
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    Okay,

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    Senior Member Gian's Avatar
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    I'll jump in the Teflon band wagon, and say it's a No No for brake systems.
    Hard Teflon tubing is "not" the same as liquid or tape. The Liquid or tape can get into the system and cause problems. Like restrictions or even plugging passages.
    Teflon is only a lube to help seal by reducing the friction of the threads so you can get the fitting tight. It is not a sealant. Though there is some liquid Teflon with sealer in it.

    This is taken out of the FPS Hydraulic Certification Hand book.
    "Teflon is NOT recommended for Hydraulic or fuel systems. If you absolutely have to use it on these systems. Make sure there is none on the end of the fitting, so it does not have a chance to enter the system"
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    That's not a Typo, I just can't spell no so well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Force McCocken View Post
    Excellent. Maybe I just have bad luck.

    Eyeballs, if you want to try my Motive, message me.

    I mentioned this thread to my wife, who also knows the bleeding protocol. "Honey? Do you have a minute to spare in the garage?" is apparently the tell that says I'm doing brake work. She knows to put on comfortable shoes and bring a beverage.
    I appreciate the offer, but I hate driving down to Atl. I'll just buy one. I get the feeling I'll probably end up buying caps for all my vehicles, but I'll start with just the miata clutch and brake.
    '99 miata

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