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Thread: High Fidelity Hearing Protection?

  1. #1
    Señor Member b3d3g1's Avatar
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    Default High Fidelity Hearing Protection?

    Any experience with so called "high fidelity hearing protection"?

    https://www.amazon.com/EarPeace-Ear-...dp/B00FMRZJ3Y/
    The particular ones I linked, have a changeable filter for different dB level drops.
    Marketed towards concert goers and musicians, but also has a smaller section for motorcycle and racing. Cheap enough at $22 that I might just give it a try.

    I usually wear earbud style headphones on my motorcycle with either a talking podcast or no audio just for comfort while riding. I'm Hoping it will be good at the track too as long as I can still clearly hear my engine. Maybe it will save me from the Springfield Dyno exhausts.
    -Anthony
    1991 Miata - Trogdor SuperMiata
    2011 Ram 2500 - all the torque
    2016 Kawasaki Versys 650LT - commuter
    2016 KTM 690 Duke - parked at the dealer

  2. #2
    Senior Member robburgoon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by b3d3g1 View Post
    Any experience with so called "high fidelity hearing protection"?

    https://www.amazon.com/EarPeace-Ear-...dp/B00FMRZJ3Y/
    The particular ones I linked, have a changeable filter for different dB level drops.
    Marketed towards concert goers and musicians, but also has a smaller section for motorcycle and racing. Cheap enough at $22 that I might just give it a try.

    I usually wear earbud style headphones on my motorcycle with either a talking podcast or no audio just for comfort while riding. I'm Hoping it will be good at the track too as long as I can still clearly hear my engine. Maybe it will save me from the Springfield Dyno exhausts.
    Some pod or music might be nice for the grid or once the field checks out.
    TrackDayHookey likes this.

  3. #3
    Member dc2696's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by b3d3g1 View Post
    Hoping it will be good at the track too as long as I can still clearly hear my engine. Maybe it will save me from the Springfield Dyno exhausts.
    Do you normally wear nothing in the racecar? I use regular old tapered soft foam 3M plugs (33 NRR), SM exhaust and no plugs makes for a great headache
    FE3 NA - NB2 SM - 6262 AP1

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    RaceTape Ninja Force McCocken's Avatar
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    I know an audiologist who makes custom earplugs for racing clients in Mooresville, NC. Her husband races, she understands the audio options racers need and accommodates that. I'm sure it's a service an audiologist near you could provide and probably be more comfortable.
    Yer pal,
    Force

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    I used to use Etymotic ear plugs when playing in a country band and an orchestra, sitting in front of the trombones. They have a motorsport plug, I've never tried. I just use the grocery store foam plugs. I did switch from the LOUD SD Spec Miata exhaust to the quiet one, Kooks. It helped a lot. https://www.etymotic.com/consumer/he...er20xs-ms.html

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    Senior Member cosmin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dc2696 View Post
    Do you normally wear nothing in the racecar? I use regular old tapered soft foam 3M plugs (33 NRR), SM exhaust and no plugs makes for a great headache
    I use the same for my motorcycle. Haven't used anything for track days, but I should probably start.

  7. #7
    "Shoe"
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    I use SureFire Sonic Defenders. They are AMAZING and great for the gun range, concerts, and I wore them in the VERY LOUD Mustang GT4 racecar at Good Wood and they worked great.

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    Some large gun shows have someone who does custom molded hearing protection. Since they are molded in your ears - they fit exactly. You can get them without or with electronic audio inserts (bring what you have).

    Also good for sleeping in a noisy place (track hotels).

  9. #9
    "Shoe"
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    I have had quite a few custom ear molds made. For pure sound reduction, the EP3 Sonic Defender is pretty much as good:

    EarPro EP3 Sonic Defenders® Earplugs from SureFire

    They also have caps that you can pop open to hear lower frequencies (voices) better while clipping the damaging high frequencies. They are also very comfortable to wear for hours on end.
    b3d3g1 likes this.

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    I work in construction (management) and wear earplugs daily. I've tried just about everything and years ago I settled on the surefire sonic defenders. They are fantastic. Take hearing protection seriously, I know several people with tinnitus and a few of them have it so bad they are in support groups because it literally drives them mad.
    Stuntman and b3d3g1 like this.

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    Senior Member Neocataboi's Avatar
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    I do a lot of work in the Pro Audio industry and i've always used "HEAROS High Fidelity" ear plugs. They aren't the most comfortable but i've used them for several hours at a time while working trade show set ups and staging. I like them because they are cheap, and if i lose them i have a big pack waiting for me at the office. They also hand these out back stage at a lit of big time shows for the roadies.

  12. #12
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    Sonic Defenders are only a few bucks more and are extremely comfortable. Give them a shot.

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    Senior Member fatbillybob's Avatar
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    I wear plugs for all kinds of loud things. It does not matter what you wear. What you go for is the NRR noise reduction rating then it is about comfort, ease of use etc.

    In a helmet all you can do is some kind of plug. My Stilo has earmuffs in the helmet that can double as earphones for pit communication but the earmuffs in the stillo just plane don't work. You still need ear plugs. A real advantage comes when you can plug and ear muff and increase overall NRR by adding 5 to the NRR of the higher NRR appliance. .

  14. #14
    Señor Member b3d3g1's Avatar
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    I ended up purchasing a set of the SureFire EP4 Sonic Defenders after many of your suggestions. So far, I've only been using them on motorcycle rides but I like them.
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004DH65RI/

    They are much smaller than I was envisioning looking at the picture, even after understanding their sizing chart. They are very comfortable and I barely notice they are in my ear after a 40 minute motorcycle commute. I can easily hold a conversation with someone with them in and it doesn't really amplify your voice like when you have your fingers in your ears. Wind noise was greatly reduced which I think helps with fatigue and I can still hear the exhaust when I accelerate on my relatively quiet motorcycle. I'm looking forward to trying them on track.

    It kind of reminds me of the audio you would get in a GoPro video where you can't really tell how loud the wind noise actually was at the camera when watching playback. Once it saturates the mic, it doesn't go any louder.

    surefire.png
    Stuntman and dc2696 like this.
    -Anthony
    1991 Miata - Trogdor SuperMiata
    2011 Ram 2500 - all the torque
    2016 Kawasaki Versys 650LT - commuter
    2016 KTM 690 Duke - parked at the dealer

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